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2018 Agenda coming in March. Below you can browse the 2017 agenda.

 

7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration Opens in La Cita
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM 8th Annual WCSAD Golf Tournament
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Flores Foyer
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM Exhibitor Set Up
5:30 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Fiesta Ballroom

 

Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

100. Coding and Administration of the Addiction Severity Index
Albert Hasson, MSW
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The Addiction Severity Index is an assessment instrument designed to be administered as a semi-structured interview in one hour or less to patients who present for substance use disorder treatment. The instrument gathers information about seven areas of a patient’s life: medical, employment/support, drug and alcohol use, legal, family history, family/social relationships, and psychiatric problems. Using a 10-point scale from 0 to 9, interviewer severity ratings indicate the degree of patient problems in each of the seven problem areas, based on historical and current information. Composite scores are based entirely on current information and are indicators of the present status of the patient; they are thus useful for treatment outcome studies, since successive Composite scores can be used to summarize changes in patient status. This daylong training will review each section of the ASI in detail, including coding conventions and the proper administration of all questions.

Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

125. The Evolving Battlefield of Addiction Treatment Reimbursement
Kathryn Edgerton, JD, BS, Esq
Pete Nielsen, CEO
Supported by: AATA

Level of Instruction: All

The reimbursement landscape for addiction treatment has transformed over the past decade. Although insurance coverage and benefits have expanded access to care, conflicts have also escalated between treatment providers and third party payors (insurance companies, self-funded employer plans, and government health plans). This program will survey the “battle lines” and points of tension that have emerged in disputes between addiction treatment providers and payors, including utilization management and medical necessity, patient financial responsibility, procurement of coverage, and other “fraud and abuse” issues around marketing, offering practical guidance on risk management and provider rights in payment disputes.

 

126. Obstacles, challenges, outcomes, and effective strategies for providing substance abuses treatment to criminal justice population
BJ Davis, PSYD, LAADC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will explore the challenges barriers and what works related to providing substance abuse and co-occurring treatment with offender populations. It will address issues such as risk assessment, curriculum development, responsivity, motivation to change, self-efficacy, group dynamics, cognitive restructuring, self-management strategies, criminal sentiments and how to develop pro-social alternatives, relapse prevention, reentry, and the importance of case management and quality of life. Outcome research indicating what contributes to effective treatment with this population will be presented and the role of case management and mentoring will be discussed. The impact of relevant laws such as AB 109 and Proposition 47, and the role of collaborative courts will also be discussed. Lastly, emerging opportunities related to substance abuse professionals and providers will be presented.

Morning Break in Flores Foyer

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Intensive Learning Afternoon Workshops

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

150. Florida Model? Navigating Referral Relationships Between Outpatient Addiction Treatment and Recovery Residences
Kathryn Edgerton, JD, BS, Esq
Dave Sheridan, President
Supported by: AATA

Level of Instruction: All

As outpatient addiction treatment models have proliferated, the legality of referral and other business relationships between sober living homes and outpatient addiction treatment programs have been called into question. Confusion over what is “kosher” and what is not has been compounded by differences in state laws and, until recently, relatively little attention by regulators. This program examines widespread practices that raise serious potential risk issues for treatment programs, recovery residence operators, and marketers. The workshop will focus on understanding and navigating the legal and compliance risks and practical approaches to structuring marketing and business relationships appropriately.

 

151. Understanding the ethical obligations and professional responsibilities specific to the justice-involved client
Pete Nielsen, MA, CCJP
Frank Davis, M.Ed., AADC, CCJP, LCDC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will delve into the important issues related to ethically working with justice-involved clients.

Afternoon Break in Flores Foyer

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Hors d’oeuvres Reception Hosted by Infinity

5:30 PM – 6:45 PM

Opening Plenary

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

199. From Sobriety to Recovery: Quenching the Thirst for Wholeness
Rokelle Lerner, BS
Supported by: Crossroads Centre Antigua

Level of Instruction: All

The thirst for alcohol can be compared to men and women’s thirst for wholeness and a hunger for the sacred. One often self medicates in an effort to escape the present moment, numb their pain or avoid the “void” in their soul. In order to experience the miracle of recovery addicts need practical tools that will allow them to nourish their spirit and show up for their lives. This lecture will explore the topic of mindfulness and compassion in recovery and offer tools that will allow recovering addicts to embrace their birthright of serenity and wellbeing.

 

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7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration Opens in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Join TPAS at WCSAD

 

Friday All Day ASAM Workshop

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

201. The ASAM Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Course: Includes Waiver Qualifying Requirements
Matt Tierney, RN, MS, NP
Jacqueline P. Tulsky, MD
Supported by: ASAM

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This 8 hour course covers treating opioid use disorder using interactive, case-based learning and evidence-based practices. This course will provide the required 8 hours needed to obtain the waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in office-based treatment of opioid use disorders. ASAM is an approved provider by CSAT/SAMHSA of DATA 2000 training.

Friday All Day DOT/SAP Workshop (DAY 1)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

202. SAP Qualification and Requalification
Steven Garnham, MEd, LEAP, MAC, LAPC
Supported by: Palm Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Business Development Learning Series

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

203. Turn Down for What? Navigating the Murky World of Addiction Treatment and Behavioral Health Marketing
Harry Nelson, JD, BS, Esq
Supported by: AATA

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The growth of addiction treatment insurance reimbursement has shone a spotlight on marketing practice in addiction treatment and behavioral health that are widespread but potentially fraudulent and abusive. Many programs and professionals struggle with balancing a desire to operate in a legally compliant way against the evidence that other programs are continuing to market in ways that may be problematic but are not attracting negative attention. This workshop will focus on addiction treatment marketing practices, including common practices such as waivers or discounts of patient financial responsibility, business relationships with referral sources, call centers, and procurement of insurance. This session will focus on understanding and navigating the legal and compliance risks and practical approaches to structuring marketing and business relationships appropriately.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 1)

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

206. Navigating the Complexity of Conflicting Standards – State, Federal and Private Payors
Anelia Shaheed, JD
Supported by: Allison and Associates

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This presentation will focus on describing, comparing and contrasting the multitude of standards, such as state licensure, federal regulatory requirements, and different commercial guidelines promulgated that substance abuse and mental health providers must meet.

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

210. Improving Addiction Treatment Outcomes Using ASAM Criteria Multidimensional Assessment and Feedback Informed Treatment
David Mee-Lee, MD
Scott Miller, PhD
Supported by: The Change Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Policy makers, administrators, and providers face a number of serious challenges: How to answer the call for accountable treatment practice and deliver services that produce efficient and effective outcomes? How to accomplish these things while choosing among the latest new “empirically-validated” treatment approaches? This workshop is designed to “marry” feedback-informed work with the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Criteria’s multidimensional assessment process. To improve addiction treatment outcomes, we will introduce the research supporting a re-focusing of attention; moving beyond evidence-based practice toward “practice-based evidence.” We will outline and discuss how to organize and design a service delivery system to incorporate “practice-based evidence” into the clinical assessment, treatment, and outcomes monitoring. Participants will review the research background to client-directed, outcome informed approach; and understand how to use formal patient feedback on engagement and outcome to modify treatment using ASAM multidimensional assessment as a structure for treatment planning. The purpose is to respond rapidly to the needs of the patient and, as necessary, change the therapy, based on the actual outcome. Evidence, versus doctrine, is emphasized and used to modify and tailor services to the individual patient.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

225. Lost: Providing a Compass for Families
Jerri Avery, MEd, PhD
Supported by: Capstone Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Families and other support systems often become part of the collateral damage of addiction. Individuals who love an addict often experience feelings similar to those of their loved one who is addicted. These feelings include hopelessness, fear, hurt, shame, anger, sadness and guilt. The focus of treatment providers is often focused solely on the individual in need of treatment. Meanwhile, the family may be left struggling with pain and confusion with insufficient tools, no guidance, and ample amounts of fear and resentment. The whole process of recovery can be bewildering and frustrating to the inexperienced. Addiction professionals must stand ready to accept the call for help from loved ones, not only to guide the recovery process for the addict, but also to provide guidance and help for the loved ones.

 

226. Successful Supervision: Building Skills in Eating Disorder and Addiction Professionals
Dena Cabrera, Psy.D.
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Supervision is an important part of professional development especially needed for those working in the field of eating disorders. It requires personal and professional skills, knowledge, and clinical wisdom. Supervision carries significant professional responsibilities for both the supervisee and the supervisor. Those working with patients with eating disorders may experience their own challenges, such as body image issues, burn out, compassion fatigue, countertransference and boundary issues. This workshop will review the roles and responsibilities of a supervisor and supervisee. Guidelines in delivering excellent supervision in effort to promote positive and beneficial experience for both supervisor and supervisee will be discussed. This workshop will be interactive and engaging and will have participants practice supervision skills. Overall, this presentation will assist and support those leaders, managers, supervisors in the work with supervisees to enhance treatment, professionalism, and ethics. This is a professional development workshop that will include role-playing, audience participation, and laughter.

 

227. Missing Peace: Men, Violence, and Trauma
Dan Griffin, MA
Supported by: Sunspire

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The traditional model for working with men was built around “breaking men down” and that paradigm continues to have a significant influence on the ways in which men are treated by programs and clinicians. Even though approximately 70% of the people that go through treatment annually are men, the majority of professionals have not been trained to effectively work with men. Furthermore, men and women experience, respond to, exhibit the symptoms of and recover from trauma differently. Therefore, the interventions and treatment services we provide to men must also be different. Client-centered treatment cannot mean avoiding the systemic impact of gender on our clients – male and female identified. Many treatment professionals may be unintentionally re-traumatizing male participants thereby increasing their risk of failure in the program. This presentation offers practical guidance and tools for professionals working with men in navigating these challenging areas.

 

228. Invigorating Individual, Group and Family Work with Experiential Therapies
Beverly Roesch
Aaron Olson
Supported by: Cirque Lodge

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will demonstrate the value of experiential techniques in individual, group, and family work. Attendees will have the opportunity to actively participate in a variety of these techniques during the workshop. Techniques will include sociometry, work with symbols, meditation, family sculpting and empty chair work.

 

229. Culture of Integrated Treatment
Andrew Kurtz, MA, MFT
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This training will review the benefits of service integration for consumers with co-morbidities and highlight the challenges to integration of care. Challenges of integrating services are rooted in organizational and cultural differences across disciplines and professions. We will discuss roles of mental health staff in integrated settings, and highlight ways that various members of the treatment team can support the overall health of consumers. Additionally, we will review key medical issues that frequently co-occur with mental health and substance use disorders, and discuss how behavioral health providers can better identify co morbid health and mental health disorders.

 

230. Enhancing Cultural Competency Within a Therapeutic Environment Toward Latino Populations
Jose Aragon, MEd, CADC II, ICADC, SAP
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop will welcome discussion on strategies to improve client engagement, improve therapeutic relationships, improve treatment retention and
improve treatment outcomes. Additionally, the workshop will identify ways to decrease disparities while exploring strategies to improve an organization’s sustainability.

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

240. Assessing and Improving Addiction Treatment Outcomes
Veena Kumari, PhD, C Psychol, AFBPsS
Tonmoy Sharma, MBBS, MSc
Supported by: Sovereign Health Group

Level of Instruction: All

There is great variability in treatment outcomes for addiction and/or mental health patients. In order to fully assess and find new ways to improve addiction treatment outcomes, Sovereign Health has rolled out a program (i) to fully document the symptom and behaviour profiles of people who seek treatment at any one of Sovereign Health facilities, (ii) to assess the effectiveness of Sovereign Health treatment programs using E-basis24 and other measures of patients’ personal and clinical recovery, and (iii) to examine possible associations between the characteristics of patients at intake and their treatment outcome.

Business Development Learning Series

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

250. Business Development/Service & Support – Accountability, Transparency and Integrity: A Business Development Solution-Focused Panel
Ben Cort, Lee FitzGerald, Harry Nelson, Esq, and Howard Samuels, PhD

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will cover a broad range of responsibilities and knowledge needed to be successful Business Development professional while maintaining integrity the addiction treatment industry. Significant attention will be spent considering the ethical responsibilities inherent to the field as well as practices outside of the norm. We will discuss key driving principles including: Evolution and status of the addiction treatment industry; Statistics; Trends and goals of treatment; Business Development’s strategic role in the continuum of care; Funding, Reimbursement and Incentives; Best Practices; Ethical guidelines and responsibilities; and Codes of Conduct. Small group discussions will also be part of the experiential nature of the Program.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

251. In Vino Veritas: The Intersection Between Domestic Violence and Substance Use/Abuse
Lynn Fairweather, MSW

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

What happens when a substance abuser is also either abusing a partner, or being abused themselves? This unique 90 minute presentation introduces participants to the issue of how domestic violence intersects with substance use and abuse, for both the victim and the batterer. Beginning with a review of domestic violence foundations, survivor and subject matter expert Lynn Fairweather, MSW explains how substance abuse and intimate partner violence can both facilitate, exacerbate, and perpetuate one other. Areas covered are substance use/abuse as a violence risk factor, self-medicating in victims, the impact of violence on recovery, trauma informed treatment, how substance use/abuse can affect the criminal justice response to violence, domestic violence screening guidelines, and safety planning around substance use/abuse. Also included is a section on how practitioners can recognize, respond to, and refer affected clients. This session is appropriate for all professionals who work in the substance abuse and recovery field.

 

252. Masculinity, Feelings, and ED: An exploration in working with male clients struggling with an eating disorder
Stephen Reeder, MA, LPCC, NCC
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Toughness, independence, emotional control, and logic; these are words often used in society to describe men. The National Institute of Mental Health suggests that roughly 1,000,000 men and boys suffer from eating disorders. In this day and age young men are still challenged with the complexities of “Masculinity”. Such as, “I am not a normal guy; I have pretty good emotional intelligence.” While this is a response we are hearing more and more from men in treatment, and is a step in the right direction, it is still a damaging idea. This lecture will focus on these complexities as they apply to working with men in treatment, emotional anorexia in men, and how as clinicians we can adjust our approach to working with males in a treatment setting.

 

253. LGBT and Straight Addiction-Same But Different. Meth Use Sheds Light!
Manny Rodriguez
Supported by: La Fuente Hollywood Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will present real life LGBT addiction stories and provide answers on why treatment centers and mental health professionals must be fully conversant with the individual needs of the LGBT population. Meth Amphetamine is a top drug of choice among LGBT people, the workshop will also include a 30-minute video presentation of “Meth Insight & Recovery” (2016) produced by La Fuente Hollywood Treatment Center and Impulse United. Workshop attendees will receive a DVD for their educational and treatment purposes. Following the video presentation, specific modules will be discussed in an interactive question, answer and discussion format. Treatment professionals from the video will be available for comment and instruction.

 

254. Adolescent and Young Adult Continuum of Care: Increasing Engagement and Decreasing Trauma
Heather Hayes, M.Ed., LPC, CIP, CAI
Supported by: Hayes, Davidson and Associates

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The young adult population can be difficult, challenging, and rewarding to intervene on. As Interventionists and behavioral health experts, we have learned just as much from our missteps than we have from our successes; the entire evolutionary process has shaped a new set of guidelines for safely and effectively engaging adolescents, their families/support systems, the treatment they seek and the long-term strategy for keeping everyone anchored to the most beneficial path. Without effective communication, awareness of emerging trends, and healthy engagement by everyone involved, the long-term continuum of care suffers. Our workshop will address the best ways to secure optimal, long-term outcomes. This workshop is designed to help identify the differences in intervening on the young adult while effectively implementing a long-term continuum of care that engages the entire support system, while teaching participants to recognize and embrace the emerging trends they must acknowledge in order to maintain success.

 

255. Cultural Considerations in the female prison population
Rochelle Smith, MS, LMFT
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Within the materials to be presented, speaker will address working with the female prison population, the prison culture, and how cultural differences need to be taken into consideration when treating clients. The material would focus on the diverse cultures incarcerated and creating a rehabilitation treatment plan to be individualized for each client. Speaker will discuss that within the female population, a subculture exists which also needs to be taken into account when implementing a rehabilitation strategy. Speaker will also discuss trauma within the prison population, the impact of trauma on inmates, how different cultures view trauma and treatment tactics.

 

256. Continuing Care Plan Management for Substance Use Disorders: Empirical Findings from a Naturalistic Treatment Sample
Steven Proctor, PhD
Supported by: Air Healthcare Solutions

Level of Instruction: All

Substance use disorder treatments are increasingly being contextualized within a disease management framework. Within this context, there is an identified need to maintain patients in treatment for longer periods of time in order to help them learn how to manage their disease. It is well-documented that patients who comply with their recommended continuing care treatment regimen demonstrate favorable outcomes. What is less understood, however, is whether there are specific short-term continuing care performance variables indicative of better long-term prognosis. Preliminary findings from two research studies using a naturalistic residential treatment sample are presented. Study 1 evaluated the effectiveness of an intensive protracted post-discharge telephone-based care plan management approach on adherence to continuing care plans and substance use outcomes. Study 2 determined the extent to which attendance at an initial outpatient appointment post-discharge from residential treatment was associated with differential outcomes at 12 months. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:15 PM – 4:00 PM

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 2)

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

257. The Role of Outcomes for Providers
Murray Zucker , MD

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The word “outcomes” is commonplace in discussions of addiction treatment, but what does it really mean? Are there standard definitions and measures? How is this data obtained? What is being measured and what does it mean? These questions and more will be discussed from the perspective of data analytics, the payer, and the provider. How should providers think about developing an outcome orientation and how can they use that data in discussions with payers and employers? What can technology add to outcomes measures?

Business Development Learning Series

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

274. Getting Patients in the Door the Right Way: Law and Ethics of Marketing Practices
Michael C. Barnes, Esq
Daniel McClughen, Esq
Supported by: DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

A timely discussion on the trends, laws, regulations, and ethics of compensated patient referrals and marketing arrangements.
The presentation – led by experienced attorneys who practice health care law and policy – will include an in-depth look at the laws and regulations governing compensated patient referrals and marketing arrangements, including the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, False Claims Act, and Criminal Health Care Fraud Statute, and state fee-splitting and patient brokering laws. The presenters will discuss common schemes to avoid, highlight recent enforcement trends, and recommend best practices for complying with current laws and regulations as well as high ethical standards.

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

275. Food Addiction and Eating Disorder Treatment
John Camarillo, MS, RD
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Studies have shown that a neurochemical reaction occurs within the reward system of the brain in individuals with drug or alcohol addictions. This leads these individuals to seek out the substance that illicit these “good” or rewarding feelings they are experiencing as result of using that substance. The Food Addiction theory suggests that a similar neurochemical reaction occurs in some individuals when highly palatable foods, generally sugar, excess fat, and/or salt, are consumed. This presentation aims to describe the neurochemical process of addiction in general, review the current empirical data surrounding the Food Addiction theory, address how Food Addiction can play a role in eating disorder treatment, and review dietary recommendations for treating an individual with an eating disorder and Food Addiction.

 

276. LGBTQIA History & Culture “History in the Making”
Kristina Padilla, M.A., IMF, LAADC, ICAADC, CGS
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

LGBT culture or LGBTQIA culture is a culture shared by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/ questioning, intersex, and asexual people. It is sometimes referred to as queer culture, while the term gay culture may be used to mean “LGBTQIA culture”. LGBTQIA culture varies widely by geography and the identity of the person. The History of the LGBTQ+ community will be discussed by generation and explained in simple terms.

 

277. Engaging Traumatized Families: A Transgenerational Approach to Families, Trauma, and Addiction
Michael F. Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC
Supported by: Timberwolf Clinical Services

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Attention to the co-occurrence of addiction and trauma has resulted in the development of trauma informed/integrated treatment models. Absent from these models is the recognition that family members are often as traumatized as their loved one in treatment. For some the trauma is associated with the active addiction experienced by their loved one, but for others it stems from growing up in an addicted/dysfunction family, their own attachment struggles, and their experience of childhood and adult traumas. Clearly, traumatized parents or partners will influence how the family copes with active addiction. This presentation defines secondary trauma and identifies immediate and long-term systemic changes seen within traumatized families. It will present a transgenerational view of how addiction and trauma can be transferred between generations and how these factors impact family functioning. Finally, attendees will learn simple engagement strategies and techniques to better assess and treat secondary trauma within families.

 

278. Synthetic Drugs
Andrew Kurtz, MA, MFT
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Unlike major illicit drugs of abuse, synthetic drugs have only recently appeared on the street. Whereas other drugs have been subjected to years of testing, and numerous clinical trials and research on the effects on users’ brains and bodies, our knowledge of synthetic drugs is often based on newspaper stories, pro-drug websites, and “street” information. The purpose of this workshop is to provide multi-disciplinary behavioral health practitioners with a detailed overview of synthetic drugs, most notably substances known on the street as K2, Spice, and Bath Salts. Part I of this session will describe the major classes of commonly available synthetic drugs, and discuss the acute and chronic effects of synthetic drug use. The session will also review the neurobiology of synthetic drug use and provide information on how to identify and assess synthetic drug users. It will conclude with a discussion of the clinical implications of synthetic drug use.

Friday Evening Event

7:30 PM – 9:30 PM

299. An Evening Under the Stars

Level of Instruction: All

Join us in true Spanish splendor in the La Casa Courtyard for an inspired open air evening event. Delicious hors d’oeuvres and desserts surrounded by friends and colleagues make it an even more out of the ordinary experience. Whether an artist, musician, or athlete, balancing public persona and a healthy recovery creates challenges experienced by the recovering community everyday life. A panel of very special guests will highlight the educational portion of the night. For high profile clients, it is often very difficult to envision how to balance stress, recovery, and their career. If the right balance isn’t achieved, clients won’t find the perspective needed for long term sobriety. Our distinguished speakers will discuss their journey and reflect on the most impactful recovery experiences that allowed them to celebrate sobriety.

Click here to register for the event for free and view more information on the speakers!

 

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7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration Opens in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM COPE Meeting

Saturday All Day DOT/SAP Workshop (DAY 2)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

300. SAP Qualification and Requalification
Steven Garnham, MEd, LEAP, MAC, LAPC
Supported by: Palm Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 3)

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

301. Show Me the Money: Law and Ethics of Billing and Collections Practices
Michael C. Barnes, Esq
Daniel McClughen, Esq
Supported by: DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

A timely discussion on the trends, laws, regulations, and ethics of billing and collections practices.
The presentation – led by experienced attorneys who practice health care law and policy – will include an in-depth look at the laws and regulations governing billing and collections practices to facilitate speedy reimbursement from clients and insurers. Presenters will discuss the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, False Claims Act, Criminal Health Care Fraud Statute, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as well as parity, assignment of benefit, and patient assistance program laws. The presenters will discuss common schemes to avoid, highlight recent enforcement trends, and recommend best practices for complying with current laws and regulations as well as high ethical standards. They will also explain what to do if insurers refuse to reimburse legitimate claims or send payments directly to patients.

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

302. THOU SHALT NOT: The Crossroads between Moral Injury and PTSD/Trauma
Judy Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT-R
Supported by: The Guest House Ocala

Level of Instruction: All

This presentation will correlate the phenomenon of relapse as a survival mechanism to provide, relief, respite, avoidance, medicating or numbing feelings of pain, remorse, guilt or shame surrounding trauma and PTSD as well as explore the crossroads with Moral Injury, the Soul Wound. Additionally we will provide research, case studies, and exercises presented by Judy T Crane, to define a deeper understanding of trauma,PTSD and its Soul Sister, Moral Injury. Relapse will be defined as relapse in substance and alcohol addiction, process addictions, mental health diagnoses and relapse in self-defeating behaviors. The history of Moral Injury, codes of religious dogma, spiritual beliefs and codes of honor will be described. Finally, a correlation between “chronic relapse, suicide, overdoses, Spiritual Therapies and interventions and the place the Moral injury has played in the lives of various types and stages of Moral injury survivors will be presented.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

325. Trauma, PTSD, EMDR, and the Mind: Use of the Grief Model in Healing Traumatic Experiences
Cynthia Westcott, MA, BS, LCSW
Supported by: Workshops

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Based on the work of Bessel van der Kolk, Peter Levine, Robert Schear, Lorie Dwinell and Jane Middelton Moz, and others, we will explore 1. How traumatic experiences as well as grief and loss are registered as psychological injury and encoded in the brain in a similar fashion; 2. How the ‘stages’ of grief effectively describe the subjective experience of feeling, emotional, and cognitive states as an individual grieves a variety of usual and unusual life experiences; 3. What internal and external support and anchoring is most helpful or even necessary for successful grieving to occur.

 

326. Families First-Designing A Program to Help Veteran Families
Kathy Willis, MS, PhD, ICADC, CADC II, CEAP (ret.), CCTP
Frederick Sautter, MSW, LCSW
Supported by: FEAST

Level of Instruction: All

An increasing number of our combat Veterans return to their families with trauma related problems up to and including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD in a spouse and parent causes secondary traumatic stress in other family members. We will explore the dynamics of PTSD, how it impacts the individual’s brain, body, emotions and actions. We will also define traumatic stress and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and discuss the diagnosis. We will explore the impact on family members. Very few family members are able to identify traumatic stress in themselves, and therefore they do not seek help. This is a trans-generational problem that is passed down in families through epigenetics and behaviors. This program will teach the attendees how to design a series of town hall meetings with education and connection to services available to Veterans and their families both through the VA and in the private community.

 

327. A Tough Nut to Crack: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Individuals Struggling with Eating Disorders
Stephen Reeder, MA, LPCC, NCC
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Many forms of Behavioral Therapy focus on challenging our Negative Automatic Thoughts. This can be a lot of work for a malnourished individual struggling with an eating disorder to handle. An estimated almost 1.2 million individuals in California alone struggle with an eating disorder. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an empirically based psychological intervention that focuses on Mindfulness and Acceptance with the goal to achieve Psychological Flexibility rather than Experiential Avoidance.

 

328. Introduction to ASAM Criteria
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The ASAM criteria are a set of criteria for providing outcome-oriented and results-based care in the treatment of addiction. They provide separate placement criteria for adolescents and adults to create comprehensive and individualized treatment plans to be used in service planning and treatment across all services and levels of care. With the impending approval of the Drug Medi-Cal Organized Delivery System (ODS) Waiver (DMC Waiver), implementation of the ASAM criteria will become an integral part of system transformation in California. The training will begin with a brief overview of the ASAM criteria. Then, the presenters will provide participants with a cross-walk between the levels of care articulated in the ASAM criteria and the levels of care defined by the DMC Waiver.

 

329. Providing Better Care in Working with the LGBTQ+ Community
Jay Callahan, MS, LADC, LPC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop provides practitioners with some knowledge and skills to provide better care for the LGBTQ+ population while increasing their cultural awareness. Participants will explore the impact of heterosexism and cisgender privilege while gaining insight into the lives of LGBTQ+ individuals. Information will be provided regarding terminology, the importance of pronouns, and trauma- informed clinical considerations. Holistic and strengths based approaches to increase wellness will be incorporated throughout.

 

330. Bipolar Borderline and Substance Abuse-treating the most difficult cases
Debra Meehl
Supported by: Meehl Foundation

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Bipolar, Borderline and Substance Treating the most difficult cases: Will be an interactive presentation on using Dialectical Behavior Therapy, and the latest scientific research on SPECT imaging and medication for substance abuse using case examples, open questioning and interactive demonstrations. Case examples will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of DBT in treating mood and personality disorder with co-occurring substance abuse. ( Intro)

Saturday Luncheon Hosted by Rosewood Institute/Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

12:15 PM – 12:45 PM

350. There and Back Again… Opioids
William Jacobs, M.D.
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Dr. William Jacobs has had a 35 year spanning the changes in the guidelines and standards of care for the prescription of opioids for chronic pain. His presentation will discuss how it was, how it changed and his opinions of the results of these changes. He will discuss the expansion and growth of pill mills in Florida as well as national and their impact on opiate use, abuse, entry into treatment and overdose deaths. He will review the recent CDC guidelines which move the standard of care back to a safer and more evidence based practice.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

351. Trauma & Addictions-Signs and Symptoms Barriers to Recovery
Libby Timmons, M.Ed, LISAC, CEAP
Supported by: Elements

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will be lively and interactive. The topics of attachment disorders, covert and overt trauma will be addressed as they related to roadblocks to recovery. In addition to trauma, process addictions and second stage recover will be discussed. This presentation will include tools for the attendees to utilize in their personal and professional worlds. Attendees will be given the opportunity to see process addictions, codependency and intimacy disorders as they relate to the Jellinek Curve. Participants will be offered some experiential activities that will transfer from the workshop into their professional world.

 

352. The Role Of Resilience: Deconstructing Treatment Barriers For Adolescents, Young Adults, And Their Family Systems
Judith Landau
Supported by: Arise

Level of Instruction: All

Young Adults find themselves at a critical developmental juncture where competing demands and expectations require significant focus, attention and resilience in order to thrive. These societal, social, intellectual, emotional and physical pressures can be almost too much to bear for even the most adaptive and well-adjusted young adults who are just now adjusting into their not quite mature brains. Imagine now inserting mental health challenges, trauma, and/or addiction into this scenario, and the journey into responsible adulthood just became even more challenging and complicated. How will they handle it? Where will they find answers? What options do they have? How can they find the resilience needed in order to thrive?

Dr. Landau will share her evidence-based research, ARISE Method, and ARISE Continuum of Care to address these scenarios and provide insight and tools to emphasize the importance of family systems and collaborative care measures when decoding and treating family trauma.

 

353. Bridging the Gap: Mental Health with the Asian American population
Shana Chan, LMFT
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Introductory

With the rise of the Asian American population in the United States, especially California, the importance of understanding different cultural aspects when working with this population is critical. This presentation gives an overview of main values in Asian American culture, potential factors that are correlated to the development of substance use, eating disorders, and depression in Asian Americans and therapeutic considerations when working with the population. The main goal of this presentation is utilize effective ways to treat the Asian American population and their families with a flexible, cultural lens.

 

354. Changing Course: Modifying Treatment Interventions for Individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
Ruth Richardson, JD
Supported by: Syndrome

Level of Instruction: All

It has been reported that approximately 30% of individuals with FASD seek chemical dependency treatment services. FASD is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, which can produce a range of physical and neurobehavioral issues. The organic brain damage associated with FASD affects how individuals on the spectrum perceive and comprehend treatment and recovery. This session will provide an overview of FASD and provide an understanding of the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure. It will also provide a brief overview of the impact of prenatal exposure to other substances. The session will explore the intersection with addiction, trauma, and the criminal justice system. Attendees will also hear some common challenges that can be experienced with this population related to chemical health and recovery and the red flags associated with identifying this population. Finally, we will explore practical and promising approaches and strategies for addressing recovery with individuals on the spectrum.

 

355. Best Practices in Addiction Treatment
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The purpose of this training is to introduce participants to Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs). During the training participants will be exposed to current Evidence-Based behavioral SUD treatment approaches including: Motivational Interviewing, Relapse Prevention, Contingency Management, Medication-Assisted Treatment, and Matrix Model of Intensive Outpatient Treatment. Time will be allotted to discuss implementation of EBPs, benefits of effective implementation, and challenges.

 

356. Addiction – pandemic of modernity – crisis of meaning
Alastair Mordey, BA Hons, FDAP
Supported by: The Cabin Addiction Services Group

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Addiction is a modern pandemic affecting every continent on earth. It is a predominantly modern illness caused by loss of belief systems and a crisis of meaning in modern society. In this presentation Alastair outlines the biological evidence that addiction is a predominantly dopamine related disorder which affects the brains salience and meaning making networks, caused by the way that those genetic mutations are expressed through neglectful, meaningless and isolated environments. Alastair will outline how addiction is a syndrome form of illness which manifests through a wide range of human behaviours, and how those different ‘strains’ of the illness should be comprehensively screened for by any comprehensive treatment programme.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:15 PM – 4:00 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

375. Changing the Trajectory of Transgenerational Trauma in the Addicted Family System
Jean Campbell, LCSW, CETIII, TEP
Supported by: Action Institute of California

Level of Instruction: All

In order to address the transgenerational trauma that lives at the core of addiction, family members must be helped to understand and integrate the need for their own ongoing recovery, not just that of the addict. When the entire family system can come together to address the core trauma, shame and family secrets that have undermined intimacy and connection within the system, it allows them to work together towards a greater level of honesty, authenticity and compassion, changing the family dynamics in the short-term, and their trajectory for generations to come.

In this didactic and experiential workshop, participants will be educated on the importance of long-term treatment for the entire family system and will be taught specific and effective action techniques that can be taken directly back to their work with families.

 

376. To STEP or Not to Step: Appropriate Use of the 12 Steps in the Treatment of Eating Disorders
Donald Durham, PhD
Supported by: Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This lecture will address the question of whether, and when, an eating disorder is an addiction. A conceptualization of an integrated approach will be provided, taking into account the current best-practice methodologies from the field of psychology as well as the tried-and-true approaches of addictions recovery. Finally, a progression of treatment will be suggested as a guide to treatment planning.

 

377. The ABC’s of LGBTQ: Working with LGBTQ Clients in Treatment
Jim Barry, M.S. Psychology, B.S. Psychology, CADC II, LAADC
Supported by: Betty Ford Center / CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The ABC’s of LGBTQ presentation is designed to assist staff in gaining a clearer understanding of issues associated with the LGBTQ demographic, resulting in a holistic treatment approach in addressing the unique needs of LGBTQ patients in treatment settings.

 

378. Discovering Story-Karpman Triangle, Rising Strong and 12 Step
Louise Stanger, ED.D, LCSW, CDWF, CIP
Supported by: All About Interventions

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

We all have Stories we tell ourselves. Using the Karpman Triangle as a way in participants will be given the tools necessary to help their clients rewrite their stories using the evidenced based methodology of Brene Brown . Integrating into the power of discovery will be how 12 step work facilities this process.Participants will acquaint themselves with key concepts from Rising Strong and the Karpman Triangle and worksheets will be given that they can use in everyday practice.

Saturday Movie Night

7:30 PM – 9:30 PM

399. The Invisible War
With Presentation by Kathy Willis, MS, PhD, ICADC, CADC II, CEAP (ret.), CCTP

From Oscar® and Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Kirby Dick comes THE INVISIBLE WAR, a groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of America’s most shameful and best-kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military. The film paints a startling picture of the extent of the problem – today, a female soldier in combat zones is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire. Twenty percent of all active-duty female servicewomen are sexually assaulted. Many of these survivors are now Veterans who have either never sought treatment or did not receive adequate treatment and support while in the military. As Veterans return home, more frequently healthcare providers will encounter Veterans in their practice. This film and discussion will examine the impact of MST (Military Sexual Trauma) and identify strategies for providers and clinicians to use in therapeutically responding to and supporting MST survivors. Rick Sautter, LCSW, CDR, USN (Ret.) and Kathy (Kat) Willis, PhD, CADC II will engage in an interactive dialogue to discuss the impact of MST and supportive strategies for survivors.
Objectives:

  • Learn how to identify the signs and symptoms of Rape Trauma Syndrome and PTSD
  • Identify the role of the healthcare provider in threating the MST survivor
  • Identify community resources to support MST survivors

 

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7:00 AM Registration Opens in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

400. Marijuana Impacts on Adolescents
Allan Barger, MDiv, MSW
Supported by: Prevention Research Institute

Level of Instruction: All

Marijuana is often viewed as a benign or even beneficial. However, a growing body of research published in peer reviewed journals suggests marijuana use during the teenage years has risks for more severe problems in the adult years. These include increased risks for addiction, other mental health disorders, impacts on IQ and cognitive functions, changes in brain structure, and certain forms of cancer.
This session will explore — with research references — what this new body of literature offers. These findings will be offered in a context of how to use the information to impact prevention and treatment practices and outcomes. In particular, participants will explore the findings in light of clients tasks necessary for behavior change.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

425. Bridging Divides: 12 Step Recovery and Feminist, LGBTQ, and Atheist Populations
Rev. Jack Abel, MDiv, MBA
Supported by: Caron

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop presents resources, approaches, and clinical philosophy for best practices in addressing the spiritual care of patients and families affected by addiction, being sensitive to the difficulties that particular populations have including questions of gender, sexual identity, culture, and religion. Each of the presenters is experienced in providing patient-centered spiritual care in residential addictions treatment to diverse populations.

Present treatment of use disorders has developed significantly since 1939 and the publishing of the historic “Big Book” of Alcoholics Anonymous. At the same time, the ‘grass roots’ recovery community remains an important resource sought out by many individuals and families during and after formal treatment. The historical distance from founding documents is one source of tensions between clinical practice, the recovery community, and individuals and families seeking help. Questions are raised by persons representing different stances that can feel excluded or typecast by the historic recovery frame of reference.

 

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  • Wonderfully scientific, applicable and well-presented addiction conference. Will attend next year. Thank you!


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  • WSCAD 2016 was one of the best events I've ever attended. Looking forward to next year!


  • I look forward to this conference all year! It remains my very favorite! Thank you for making it a wonderful time of networking and education. It is now like a reunion for me.


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  • Top level instructors teaching "cutting edge" information at a beautiful and historic resort.


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