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7:00 AM – 7:00 PM Registration is Open in Diego Rivera
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM WCSAD Golf Tournament
10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Exhibitor Set Up
5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Fiesta Ballroom
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Hors D’oeuvres Reception in the Exhibit Hall

 

Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

100. New Laws, New Obligations: Ethics for 2020 (6 CEs/CMEs)
Pete Nielsen, MA, LAADC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Laws and regulations regarding addiction treatment are changing fast. Keeping up on how these changes impact your practice and programs can be challenging. Seasoned ethics expert, Pete Nielsen, breaks down the new laws and what they mean to staff, owners, and clients. Packed with practical examples and lengthy question and answer time, this full-day workshop fulfills continuing education requirements for most certifications and gives participants the latest knowledge of important new laws. From patient brokering to advertising, new rules mean that everyone needs to update their skill set in this area. Pete has been at the forefront of implementing the new California and national laws and can answer questions with accuracy and provide with resources to share with your program and colleagues.

 

101. Attachment, the Client and You. A Dyadic Approach to Trauma Treatment (6 CEs/CMEs)
Judy Crane, LMHC, ICADC, CSAT-r
Thomas Pecca, MA, LMHC, CSAT, CTT
Supported by: The Guest House Ocala

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

When working with complex layered trauma there are almost always accompanying attachment issues. To help a client fully heal, these attachment issues must be addressed concurrently. A client’s style of attachment impacts his/her relationships and therapy, at its core, is a relationship and often a deeply intimate one. Our clients bare their souls to us and if we approach them in a way that triggers their attachment defenses, our job is made that much more difficult. Understanding attachment style helps the clinician create a safer container for the client to open up and work on their traumatic wounds. This presentation helps to identify a client’s attachment style as well as our own and looks at the ways a clinician’s attachment style can hinder or assist the client’s progress.

 

102. An Arts-Based Neurosequential, Multimodal, and Bilateral Approach to Trauma-Informed SUD Treatment (6 CEs/CMEs)
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ATR-BC, REAT, ICAADC, LAADC
Elizabeth Davis, MFA, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP ATR
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Eva Young, MFA, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Supported by: Trauma Institute and Child Trauma Institute, Cumberland Heights, and Art Therapy Collective

Level of Instruction: All

Developmental Trauma (a term denoting how chronic neglect/abuse/adversity experienced in childhood subsequently impacts physical, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral development) complicates the treatment of SUD. Due to the complex nature of developmental trauma, clients struggle with traditional verbal, behavioral and cognitive approaches. This didactic creative arts experiential intensive will demonstrate how neurodevelopmental creative approaches, informed by Bruce Perry’s Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT), can be integrated into trauma-informed addictions treatment to help improve outcomes. Participants will experience how expressive therapy approaches that address “bottom up” strategies help improve client emotional/behavioral regulation and increase reflective functioning. Participants will engage in joint neurosequential art activities such as percussion instrument rhythmic drumming and Winnicott’s Squiggle Drawing culminating in The Squiggle Story to bilateral Blind Contour Drawing (Nicolaides). These highly effective creative directives promote the organization of chaotic trauma experiences by offering structured meaning, attunement through mirroring art directives, containment, and affect regulation.

 

Intensive Learning Workshops Sponsored by NAATP

1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

110. Data Driven Recovery: Transforming the Field Through Collaborative Science (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Annie Peters, PhD, LP
Holen Hirsh, PhD
Supported by: National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP) & OMNI Institute

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Treatment for substance use disorders is inconsistently accepted as a valid form of health care, due in part to the stigma associated with these disorders and with the types of treatment available. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness and value of any form of addiction treatment, a large-scale, collaborative data collection effort is required. The National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP) has partnered with OMNI Institute, a nonprofit research organization committed to social change, to equip treatment providers with the tools and technology to engage in a collaborative outcomes measurement program. Through widespread application of simple research tools, individual clinicians and multisite treatment programs alike can contribute to this national program and help demonstrate the value of quality addiction services. This presentation will address the goals, methods, and scope of this project, as well as potential implications for improving services and increasing access to care.

 

Intensive Learning Workshops Sponsored by NAATP

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

111. NAATP Membership Matters – Discussion and Overview of the Association (No CE/CME Credit)
Nikki Soda
Supported by: National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP)

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP) is a nonprofit professional society of top treatment providers throughout the continuum of care. We support our members by providing clinical and operational resources as well as law and policy advocacy. NAATP’s service as a convening body brings the industry together to promote collegiality and the dissemination of best practices. The mission of NAATP is to provide leadership, advocacy, training, and member support services to ensure the availability and highest quality of addiction treatment.

 

Opening Hors d’oeuvres Reception in the Exhibit Hall

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

199. The Trauma of Recovery: Family Integration in Treatment (2 CEs/CMEs)
Terra Holbrook, MSW, LCSW, CADC, CSAT
Supported by: SeaGlass Intensives and Consulting

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

In our efforts to create family programs, we often neglect the experience and expertise of the families themselves. This workshop will address the efficacy of family programs in the treatment setting and the needs of the individuals. We will review current modalities and explore ways to enhance family work in a therapeutic setting which reflects current information without losing sight of the family’s needs. By attending to their recovery, we can create more integrative programs.

 

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7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Registration is Open in Diego Rivera
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

 

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

200. PRACTITIONER HEAL THYSELF(ie): Professional Online Skills & the APA (Div. 46) Recommended Guidelines For Digital Engagement (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Don Grant, MA, MFA, DAC, SUDCC IV, PhD
Supported by: Resolutions Teen Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Social media use and utilization can prove a slippery slope for anyone. For professionals especially, the appropriate, proper, smart, and safe limits of self-disclosure, boundaries, “sharing,” and even client contact can be even harder to identify, discern, and sustain. The goal of this presentation is to provide and promote online and device/social media engagement awareness, discuss ethical questions, and offer pragmatic, mindful, and intelligent guidelines for healthy professional (and personal) digital use and utilization, as well as the practice of “Good Digital Citizenship.” In addition, the presenter (Chair of the APA “Device Management & Intelligence” Committee (Div. 46)), will present and discuss recommended guidelines, tips, suggestions-and potential risks-regarding professional online social media engagement, offer suggestions and strategies for successful and intelligent online promotion for private practices, institutions, and organizations, and offer a Q&A to attendees.

All Day DOT/SAP Workshop: Part 1

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

210. SAP Qualification and Requalification: Part One (6 CEs/CMEs)
Steven Garnham, MEd, MAC, CEAP, LAP-C, CADC

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

225. A Dual Diagnosis Hiding in Plain Sight: Autism Spectrum and Substance Use Disorders (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Elizabeth Kunreuther, MSW, LCSW, LCAS

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

In this complicated day and age, clients do not fit neatly into one diagnostic category, rendering it imperative that we approach them in an integrative, collaborative manner. Psychotherapy, Psychiatry, and Admissions are being challenged to break down the historical silos and respect one another’s “seat at the table”. This presentation will explore the biases and therapeutic factors that often create barriers to the relationship between clinical/medical and admissions and will offer practical tools to overcome these conflicts. We will provide examples of a shared vision that incorporates common goals and creates a winning organizational momentum. By using data and case studies, we will apply these concepts in such a way as to broaden our understanding of our patients and colleagues so that we may deliver better outcomes.

 

226. Best Practices in Substance Use Disorder/Addiction Treatment (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Kurtz, LMFT, MA
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This workshop will review current evidence-based best practices in substance use treatment. Participants will have an opportunity to learn about organizational practices that can increase engagement and retention of substance use disorder/addiction treatment, including strategies to reduce stigma. In this Introductory level session, information about efficacy and strategies for enhancing use of Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive-Behavioral interventions will assist participants in considering opportunities for enhancing their own practice.

 

227. Understanding LGBTQi Role Responsibility during Times of Collective Uncertainly (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Renee Baribeau
Lauren Costine, PhD

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Are we being heard? Everyone wants their seats at the table. When we do not feel heard, it can be interpreted as a microaggression. This is a common problem in the dominant culture and within our LGBTQi+ communities. There are external stressors in our current political, socio-economic, and social justice realm. Hard fought rights are being threatened to cause increased stress, anxiety and depression, and common undercurrents of addiction and mental health disorders. During our conversation, we will look at the difficult questions that need to be asked such as: How do we protect ourselves, how do we support our differences, how do we as a community build greater resilience, and what are our role responsibilities?

 

228. Breaking the Cycle: First Responders, Trauma, and Substance Use (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Anna Lisa De Lima, PhD, LHMC, NCC
Supported by: Origins Behavioral HealthCare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The hazards of the first responder’s job include exposure to trauma resulting in mental health issues such as PTSD, as well as substance use disorders (SUD). First responder wellness can also have implications for patients, crews, families, and the community at large. Therefore, it is a social problem. This presenter will explore the realities of trauma exposure among first responders, the challenges of accepting treatment, and the concurrent treatment of co-occurring trauma, mental health, and SUDs. The presenter will share research that was inspired by her work with the Palm Beach County Firefighters Union, where she witnessed firsthand the impact of on the job trauma exposure on firefighters and gained a unique perspective of the first responder culture. She will describe protocols that are used to mitigate the negative outcomes of trauma and that emphasize protocols that promote growth from trauma and the development of greater resilience in first responders.

 

229. Let’s Talk About Art Therapy in Addiction and Trauma Treatment (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ATR-BC, REAT, ICAADC, LAADC
Elizabeth Davis, MFA, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP ATR
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Eva Young, MFA, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Supported by: Trauma Institute and Child Trauma Institute, Cumberland Heights, and Art Therapy Collective

Level of Instruction: All

This is a lively, interactive discussion regarding the use of the Creative & Expressive Arts Therapies within addiction/trauma/mental health settings. The panel will consist of all the WCSAD 2020 Creative Arts Therapies Educational Track Faculty Members. Discussion will be co-moderated by Tabitha Fronk and Dr. Ericha Scott. Topics may include: how the creative arts therapies have been traditionally used in addiction, recovery, and mental health settings; how this has benefitted people in recovery from addictions, mental illness, and/or trauma treatment; unique challenges and potential risks of integrating the Creative and Expressive Arts Therapies into addiction/trauma/mental health settings; ways in which the use of Creative Arts Therapies in these settings has changed over the past several decades; new research in the use of the Creative Arts Therapies; using art and the creative process as a form of self-care, to treat compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious traumatization of addiction/mental health professionals.

 

230. Emotionally Focused Therapy-Intervention and Practice in Treatment Setting (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Ryan Salter, LCSW
Supported by: Ascend Recovery

Level of Instruction: Advanced

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) was originally developed by Dr. Sue Johnson for couple’s therapy. It is a therapy that has its roots in attachment theory and provides an effective, evidence based, model that helps give structure to the attachment process. Due to these facts, this therapy has important implications for addiction treatment. EFT also works very effectively as an intervention with families in family program during addiction treatment. With these considerations, and the integration of EFT into the practice, addiction professionals can increase their effectiveness. Importantly, this presentation helps addiction professionals learn how to use the EFT model to make their overall program more attachment focused, thereby leveraging relationship and the therapeutic alliance with the clients and families in their care. Referenced in the presentation are the “Conclusions and Recommendations of the Interdivisional Task Force on Evidence-Based Therapy Relationships” which validates the importance of attachment theory and EFT in practice.

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

250. Can You See Us? Providing Culturally Competent Treatment for Persons of Color (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Delvena Thomas, MD, MPH
Zina Rodriguez, MSW
Supported by: The Cabin Group

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The term “I don’t see color” is often used by individuals to describe their views on diversity but this phrase can be detrimental in therapeutic settings when treating persons of color. The ability for providers to “see color” allows for the development of culturally competent programming and the critical factor of developing a therapeutic alliance. Data shows that racial and ethnic minority groups are likely to experience limited access and poor engagement in substance use disorder treatment. “Seeing color” allows providers to acknowledge and address the complexity of barriers and issues facing individuals and families in need of mental health and substance use disorder treatment. This workshop provides an overview of the prevalent issues impacting substance use disorders among minority communities, present information to help providers to understand cultural issues relevant to treating persons of color and examine how programs can develop processes to monitor and access efforts to incorporate cultural competency.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

251. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Diverse Addictive Behaviors (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Bruce Liese, PhD, ABPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Group therapy continues to be the predominant modality for addressing addictions and many treatment programs offer group therapy as their primary approach. This workshop will present an approach to Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for addictions that has been developed over several decades. Important features of this approach are the inclusion of persons with diverse chemical and behavioral addictions; rolling enrollment (members are permitted to come and go as they wish); and the adaptability of each session, depending on problems and concerns presented by members. Group sessions are structured, supportive, and collaborative. Goals of the group include modification of addictive behaviors, development of general coping strategies, and fostering of group support and cohesiveness. This workshop will begin with a brief presentation of Group CBT and then several participants will be invited to volunteer for a group role-play, intended to demonstrate the content and process of a typical CBT group.

 

252. The Changing Landscape of Cannabis (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Kurtz, LMFT
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Changing social, legal, and pharmacological aspects of cannabis have created challenges for providers working with clients who use cannabis products. The workshop will initiate a discussion of how marijuana is used as a medicine and the legal questions surrounding medical marijuana. Participants will review specific strategies that clinicians can use to communicate effectively with clients who are either using marijuana for medical or recreational purposes or considering its use. A brief discussion of emerging cannabis products, including synthetic drugs will be covered. The purpose of this session is to provide multi-disciplinary substance use disorder treatment practitioners with a detailed overview of the mechanism of cannabis products, reviewing the state of current research on medical application, and considerations for reducing barriers in treatment.

 

253. Now What? Integrated Business Management for Behavioral Health: PART ONE (No CE/CME Credit)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Christopher Bennett, CADC-II, CIP
Supported by: C4 Consulting, Inc.

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

As the business landscape and market conditions for behavioral health providers continues to settle, how is your business responding, adapting, or struggling to survive? With consumer needs evolving, regulatory and payor requirement rising, and business development trends shifting, what key performance measurements and lead indicators are you utilizing? Through an exploration of financial, leadership, business development, and treatment service segments of an organization, this presentation will open a dialogue to answering the critical question of how to practically integrate these fundamental operations to produce sustainable and long-term success. Participants will discuss balancing act of delivering integrated business-operational-clinical services and explore the hazards of misbalancing mission versus margin. Through an examination industry trends, practice-based evidence, and evidence-based experience in developing the strategic and tactical plans for attainment, growth, and sustainability, participants will learn pragmatic tools for understanding their organizations current needs and develop actionable plans for enhancing their organizations continued growth.

 

254. Addiction, Shame, and Trauma: Starting from the Bottom Up (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Sarah Buino, LCSW, CADC, CDWF

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

As professionals who work with clients struggling with substance use disorders, we know that shame, addiction, and trauma often come as a package deal. Treating these issues with talk therapy isn’t always effective in attending to the deep roots of the problem. In order to properly address addiction (and underlying trauma) we need to engage the limbic system by utilizing somatic and experiential interventions. This seminar is designed to view addiction, shame, and trauma from an attachment trauma perspective and utilize somatic and experiential tools built from the work of Bessel van der Kolk, Pat Ogden (sensorimotor psychotherapy), and Laurence Heller (NARM) to provide symptom relief to patients suffering from substance use disorders. Participants will learn to provide an experience rather than an explanation and take away interventions they can perform with clients in a variety of settings.

 

255. Stream of Consciousness, Haiku Poetry, and Drawing for Recovery (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ATR-BC, REAT, ICAADC, LAADC
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS

Level of Instruction: All

Right-brained and multimodal processes of learning and healing have been historically neglected in schools and dual diagnosis treatment programs. Right-brained and multimodal processes are essential components of comprehensive integrative healing. Poetry, even though it is verbal and therefore assumed to be left-brained, has been determined to be a right-brained process via Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans. Too often, clients early in recovery are asked to meditate or practice mindfulness when they cannot still their minds. Journal writing and poetry writing followed by drawing helps slow down the mind, intervene upon rumination and obsessions, for healthy contemplation. These processes are especially important to engage those who are resistant to traditional talk therapies. This is a very safe and gentle way to process
trauma, whether it is a trauma that triggered the substance use and abuse, or the traumas caused by a using and/or drug dealing lifestyle. Handouts and case examples will be provided.

 

256. Where Do We Go From Here? What Happens When Providers Experience Secondary Traumatic Syndrome, Death, or Relapse (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Benjamin Seymour, CADC, CIP, CTP
Fernando Rodriquez, MBA, MA, CIPP, CPC
Supported by: Southworth Associates

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Attendees will learn to identify burnout, compassion fatigue, and trauma activation symptoms within patient populations, themselves, and colleagues. Attendees will be given information about how to mitigate exposure, manage symptoms, and obtain support in the event they work with traumatized patients or they are traumatized, relapse, or are impaired by grief. Attendees will be taught how to implement these skills for clients and families they work with as well as colleagues. Attendees will be asked to identify their own bias, beliefs, and ideas around colleagues in crisis. Statistical data will be presented within presentation, handouts will be provided, and sources will be sited. Data will include: mortality rates amongst SUD and mental health populations, career performance data amongst behavioral healthcare workers, trauma, and relapse data amongst BH workers. Outcomes data amongst licensed professionals with SUD and correlations within the behavioral health field will be discussed.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

275. The Silver-Tsunami: Aging Substance Misuse, Depression, and Chronic Pain (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Louise Stanger, EdD, LCSW, CDWF, CIP
Supported by: All About Interventions

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

According to the US Census Bureau, the baby boomer population (78 million strong) will be over the age of 65 by the middle of the century. This means that 1 in 5 Americans will be a senior citizen – the largest group of older citizens in American history. They will outnumber 5-year-old children. Alcohol is the most widely abused substance; Illicit and prescription drug opioids use is spiking. Baby Boomers spend more money on marijuana than other cohorts. This population is dealing with anxiety, depression, loneliness, substance abuse, grief, and loss (loss of loved one, living arrangements, friends, work, or loss of function), chronic pain, and other physical maladies, (diabetes, heart attacks, hypertension, cataracts, glaucoma, dementia). These forces are merging together and creating one of the fastest growing problems in our country. This interactive session will look at best clinical practices for seniors and their families.

 

276. Do’s and Don’ts of Local Government Advocacy – the Total Anti-NIMBY Toolkit (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Sherry Daley, MIM
Pete Nielsen, MA, LAADC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory

From sober living to 120 bed facilities, interactions with local government officials can make or break a treatment and recovery company. This workshop teaches participants how to live peaceably with the entities that regulate their businesses the closest. Sherry Daley has eight years’ experience serving as a planning commissioner and 20 years in addiction treatment advocacy. Let her teach you the tips and tricks of paving the way for new projects or addressing potential rough spots many businesses encounter. Practical insights on building your public credibility, working with local publishers, and adding advocacy to your social media platforms will also be covered. Tools for finding local ordinances, addressing planning departments, and effectively utilizing the Americans with Disabilities Act, national fair housing laws, and state level protections will be highlighted.

 

277. Now What? Integrated Business Management for Behavioral Health: PART TWO (No CE/CME Credit)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Christopher Bennett, CADC-II, CIP
Supported by: C4 Consulting. Inc.

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This is the continuation of workshop #254. As the business landscape and market conditions for behavioral health providers continues to settle, how is your business responding, adapting, or struggling to survive? With consumer needs evolving, regulatory and payor requirement rising, and business development trends shifting, what key performance measurements and lead indicators are you utilizing? Through an exploration of financial, leadership, business development, and treatment service segments of an organization, this presentation will open a dialogue to answering the critical question of how to practically integrate these fundamental operations to produce sustainable and long-term success. Participants will discuss balancing act of delivering integrated business-operational-clinical services and explore the hazards of misbalancing mission versus margin. Through an examination industry trends, practice-based evidence, and evidence-based experience in developing the strategic and tactical plans for attainment, growth, and sustainability, participants will learn pragmatic tools for understanding their organizations current needs and develop actionable plans for enhancing their organizations continued growth.

 

278. Chemsex: Essential Clinical Approaches for Fused Drug Use and Sexual Behavior (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
David Fawcett, PhD, LCSW
Supported by: Seeking Integrity, LLC

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Chemsex, the pairing of drugs and sex, represents an underrecognized phenomenon requiring distinct clinical approaches. It is often assumed that problematic sexual behavior will resolve once the client is in sobriety, but in fact relapses of both drug use and sex continue. The nature of this fusion and the nature of the drugs themselves (usually including amphetamines) demand an understanding of the unique aspects of this process, including methamphetamine’s neurotoxicity and the resulting long-term impact on the reward circuitry, reduced verbal memory impacting the effectiveness of CBT, the hijacking of sexual desire, and the fusion of sexual cues and drug use triggers. This workshop builds on both neurological science and the presenter’s two decades of experience to provide an essential overview of these issues and best clinical practices to address them.

 

279. Open Expressive Arts Studio: Art-Making, Murals, Music, Movement and More! (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ATR-BC, REAT, ICAADC, LAADC
Elizabeth Davis, MFA, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP ATR
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Eva Young, MFA, MPS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Supported by: Trauma Institute and Child Trauma Institute, Cumberland Heights, and Art Therapy Collective

Level of Instruction: All

This innovative workshop, based on the Open Art Therapy Studio concept, offers diverse art media. The art studio will offer professionals an opportunity to explore multiple creative media to build art technical skills and to learn specific art interventions ethically and appropriately in treating clients with SUD and trauma. Participants will benefit from learning creative self-care to foster self-compassion, address countertransference and enhance empathy for their clients. Murals, mandalas, movement, music, body maps, masks, collage, pastels, paint and musical instruments will all be available in both directive and non-directive options. A therapist led drumming circle will be held! We will learn by being immersed in the creative process. Take a break from PowerPoints – play and move to music, paint, and discover your inner artist! The presenters include highly experienced art psychotherapists from across the country. Prior art experience is not required to participate. View the program for open studio times on Saturday and Sunday.

 

280. The Art of the Progress Note: Where Law & Ethics Meet Efficiency (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Elizabeth Irias, MS, LMFT
Supported by: Clearly Clinical

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This presentation is geared toward increasing clinicians’ understanding of the legal, ethical, and liability-related factors that come into play with clinical documentation, regardless of pay source (insurance, public funding like Medicare, or private pay, etc.) or work context (agency, private practice, school-based, etc.). Comprehensive assessment and documentation of findings are necessary for appropriate and defensible treatment plans including length of stay; such evaluations are required to achieve optimal outcomes. Participants will learn common ways in which providers unknowingly put themselves at risk in relation to documentation practices, Best Practice in clinical documentation, and strategies for clinicians about how to conceptualize Medical Necessity and simply and efficiently integrate it into different clinical documentation components. This presentation will also discuss the impact of Medical Necessity on the Utilization Review processes.

 

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7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Registration is Open in Diego Rivera
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

300. Cannabis: The Changing Face of Marijuana (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Stephen Sideroff, PhD
Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, PhD
Ben Cort
David Smith, MD, DFASAM, FISAM, FAACT
Supported by: Muir Wood

Level of Instruction: All

Legalization and growing acceptance of marijuana is resulting in increased patterns of use and potency of product. There is a need for more up-to-date information, education, intervention and treatment approaches. This expert panel will bring the latest facts on use, potency and new forms of cannabis, addiction and misuse, as well as treatment approaches. Speakers will address medical concerns, clinical issues and family systems in the treatment of adolescents and young adults as well as discuss new approaches targeting maladaptive responding to negative affect in young adult users. Specific research and data from Colorado and California will highlight the impact of legalization. The panel will address the dilemma of managing a substance that is portrayed as “benign” and reinforced by legalization, while at the same time more potent forms of the drug have altered its toxicity and abuse liability along with increased use and abuse.

Sober Living Workshop

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

302. The Landscape of Recovery Housing (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Sazha Ramos, MSW
Jason Jarreau, NCPSS
Tim Westbrook, MS
Supported by: SAFE Project, Oxford House, Inc., Camelback Recovery

Level of Instruction: All

Recovery Housing is a recovery support service that includes essential linkage to community-based assets for persons living with a SUD. Evidence supports living in a peer recovery community for a period of three months to three years (and beyond) improves overall wellness. The panel will discuss three (3) key challenges currently facing the Recovery Housing Service sector:

  • What recovery pathway(s), priority population(s) and level of support does a provider offer their residents? Why is this important information to know?
  • Uniform measurement of provider compliance with core “Social Model of Recovery Principles” is essential for many reasons. How can we navigate these waters most effectively?
  • Establishing standardized processes for measuring provider performance to quality standards is vital for the benefit of all stakeholders. How do we best achieve this objective without adopting a “prescriptive” approach to certification?

All Day DOT/SAP Workshop: Part II (Attendance of Part I Required)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

310. SAP Qualification and Requalification: Part Two (6 CEs/CMEs)
Steven Garnham, MEd, MAC, CEAP, LAP-C, CADC
Supported by: Experience Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

325. The Importance of Collaboration in Expanding Access to Care (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jaime Vinck, MC, LPC, NCC, CEIP
Rich Appert
Supported by: Sierra Tucson and Acadia Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

In this complicated day and age, clients do not fit neatly into one diagnostic category, rendering it imperative that we approach them in an integrative, collaborative manner. Psychotherapy, Psychiatry, and Admissions are being challenged to break down the historical silos and respect one another’s “seat at the table”. This presentation will explore the biases and therapeutic factors that often create barriers to the relationship between clinical/medical and admissions and will offer practical tools to overcome these conflicts. We will provide examples of a shared vision that incorporates common goals and creates a winning organizational momentum. By using data and case studies, we will apply these concepts in such a way as to broaden our understanding of our patients and colleagues so that we may deliver better outcomes.

 

326. Methamphetamine: Etiology, Physiology, and Treatment Approaches (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The purpose of this session is to provide participants with knowledge on the etiology and physiology of methamphetamine use as well as treatment approaches with and without evidence of efficacy. The information presented will assist treatment providers working with meth users in obtaining important knowledge to utilize in their clinical work with these often-challenging patients.

 

327. Food, Substance, and Anxiety: What I Learned About Anxiety During a Year-Long Road (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Robyn Cruze, MA
Linda Lewaniak LCSW, CAADC
Supported by: Eating Recovery Center and Insight Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This presentation will review a case study that focuses on how to prevent misdiagnosis of anxiety and best support clients having a more fulfilling recovery by treating the anxiety disorders that most commonly lay beneath the surface of both eating and substance use disorders. We will discuss co-occurrence of substance/eating disorders and mood and anxiety disorders and how they can be displayed in recovery. We will also review effective tools and interventions in the management for anxiety disorders.

 

328. No Shame: Fortifying Long-term Recovery Solutions with Inclusive and Accurate Sexuality Education (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Anne Hodder-Shipp, ACS
Kristine Ives, MA, LMFT
Supported by: Everyone Deserves Sex Ed and BraveHeart Retreats

Level of Instruction: All

The link between shame and addiction is universally understood, yet the role of sexual shame and self-destructive behavior is often overlooked. This workshop will discuss how to address sexual health topics – including risk reduction, consent, and healthy relationship communication – and how compassionate sexuality education can help promote healing and recovery. Presenters will discuss the impact that medically accurate, trauma-aware sexuality education can have on the long-term recovery of clients healing and moving forward from substance use disorder and stigmatized compulsive behavior, as well as how facilities can incorporate it into existing and future programs. Attendees will leave with a stronger understanding of how this kind of inclusive sexuality education can help clients heal from trauma and empower them with risk-management and harm-reduction strategies they can use with regard to their sexual and romantic decision making.

Sober Living Workshop

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

330. How and Why to Measure Outcomes (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Sazha Ramos, MSW
Jason Jarreau, NCPSS
Eva Hibnick, JD
Supported by: SAFE Project, Oxford House, Inc., One Step

Level of Instruction: All

“Outcomes” refers to different measures, depending on the stakeholder. SAMHSA collects and reports outcome data pertaining to the fiscal impact federal spending has made on hospital, criminal justice system, law enforcement, and corrections budgets. Treatment Providers monitor and report outcome data pertaining to client engagement and completion of treatment plans. Recovery Housing Providers monitor and report outcomes pertaining to length of stay, employment, and recovery group participation and, across the continuum, recovery capital measures are gaining traction.

Saturday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

350. Who How and When: Coaching vs Therapy for Maximum Outcomes (1 CE/CME)
Mike Bayer
Cecelia Mylett, PsyD, LCSW, MSW
Supported by: CAST Centers

Level of Instruction: All

Despite occasional areas of overlap and purpose, the work and processes of therapists and life coaches are distinct. With the increasing and evolving mental health care issues and general wellness, clinicians, are referring and incorporating skills from successful coaching models as well as coaches seeing more complex cases. This workshop will explore the differentiation, similarities and dissimilarities of a therapeutic approach compared to a coaching model, including: when a clinician could benefit from bringing in a coach; why making the wrong choice in a coach can threaten the well-being of a client; what boundaries are needed between clinical work and coaching work; what are the five criteria for selecting a coach; when to refer to a coach; and five screening questions when interviewing a potential coach. In gaining awareness of how we can work together, we will increase partnership and collaboration between therapists and coaches for the best interests and outcomes of our patients and clients we serve.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

351. The Neurobiology of Trauma: Including Transgenerational Trauma on the Development of Addictions (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Carolyn Ross, MD, MPH, CEDS

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Ongoing research has documented the role that trauma plays in the development of addictions. Intergenerational trauma is also being explored in families of survivors of the Holocaust, African Americans post-slavery, and in Native Americans. The passage of trauma from one generation to several generations below them has been documented in animal and human research with its etiology being related to epigenetic changes in DNA expression as a result of the original trauma. An understanding the impact of trauma, including attachment insecurity on the brain provides a more comprehensive understanding of addictions and other related disorders and fully seats trauma – acute, chronic, and transgenerational or historic – as being import underlying etiologic factors in addictions. Treatment options must therefore, not only focus on acute trauma, but provide at least an understanding of how trauma can be passed on to generations to come.

 

352. Medications for The Treatment of Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorders (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The purpose of this session is to provide participants with an overview of medications that have been shown to be effective as a component of the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders. It will include a review of the various types of opioids, an overview of each medication, its indication, to whom it is administered, and how it works. Participants will be better able to have an informed conversation with their patients/clients as a result of this session.

 

353. Smoking and SUD Treatment and Recovery (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
John de Miranda, EdM
Supported by: Peninsula Health Concepts

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will provide epidemiologic data about the nexus between tobacco addiction and the high rates of mortality and morbidity among persons with substance use disorder. Additionally, it will include national, consumer research information (focus groups and interviews with treatment professionals), and showcase model programs that are successfully adding tobacco addiction components to their traditional service portfolio. This workshop will also challenge historical misinformation that has allowed the treatment and recovery sectors to avoid adopting a robust approach to reducing combustible cigarette use among treatment and recovery populations.

 

354. Evidence-Based Strategies to Enhance Patient Engagement in Continuing Care (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Steven Proctor, PhD

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

As the treatment of substance use disorder continues to be contextualized within a disease management framework, there is a need to engage patients in care for longer periods of time in order to help them learn how to manage their disease and achieve remission. Although the value of protracted, lower-intensity continuing care following the primary treatment episode is well-documented, most patients do no engage in continuing care for any appreciable duration of time. The extant continuing care literature will be reviewed with a focus on the essential programmatic elements (e.g., duration, intensity) of an adequate continuing care model. Relevant published research, including results from several rigorous naturalistic studies conducted by the author, will be presented regarding specific evidence-based strategies to enhance patient engagement in continuing care. Promising pre-discharge interventions for use in primary treatment settings designed to increase short-term adherence to continuing care discharge plans will also be discussed.

Sober Living Workshop

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

356. Fostering a Community Culture of Peer Support (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Sazha Ramos, MSW
Jason Jarreau, NCPSS
Tim Westbrook, MS
Supported by: SAFE Project, Oxford House, Inc., Camelback Recovery

Level of Instruction: All

FHAA protects sober homes as single family residences in that they are the “functional equivalent of a family.” So, how then do recovery housing operators:

  • Screen prospective residents to determine: a) if their program is a good fit for the prospect and b) the prospect is a good fit for their peer community?
  • Engage residents as members of a “functional family?”
  • Encourage and support effective peer governance?
  • Determine if the terms House Manager and Peer Leader interchangeable?

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

375. The Evidence for Evidence-Based Trauma Treatment: Whether and When to Modify Treatment Approaches (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jonathan Green, PhD

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Many providers and facilities in our industry conduct a variety of treatments to address trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), from psychodrama to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy. While it is important for providers to offer clients treatments that may best fit their particular struggles, problems arise when providers find the need to modify treatment protocols, as there is limited guidance and evidence on how best to make these modifications. This presentation will familiarize providers with those treatment protocols that are evidence-based for the treatment of trauma and PTSD and will discuss the common evidence-based principles seen in all effective trauma treatments. Additionally, this session will help providers to better understand how these evidence-based principles can be integrated into their existing practices. Finally, common myths about popular trauma treatment approaches will be discussed.

 

376. Eating Disorders, Attachment, and the Healing Dynamics of Relationship (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Juliet Caceres, PsyD
Supported by: Timberline Knolls

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Current research has led to a greater understanding of the connection between unresolved attachment patterns and eating disorders symptoms and behaviors. This presentation will highlight the key areas of attachment ruptures and trauma that are linked with the onset and perpetuation of eating and co-occurring disorders. The presentation will incorporate current developments in polyvagal theory and interpersonal neurobiology pertinent to understanding to areas of attachment functioning most often impaired in those who struggle with eating disorders. Practical application salient to the critical dynamics of therapeutic relationships and key components in the treatment of eating disorders with attachment trauma will be discussed.

 

377. Family Engagement in Treatment: A Necessary Trend (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Diana Clark, JD, MA
Supported by: O’Connor Professional Group

Level of Instruction: All

With emerging adults launching later, and the average age of those presenting with acute substance use disorders and other co-occurring disorders is declining, parental and other family member involvement in treatment and recovery is a growing and necessary trend. The upside to this devastating disorder is that parents engaged in recovery report that the skills necessary to navigate their child’s disorder have benefitted the identified patient and the whole family structure. Indeed, the therapeutic process made them better parents, not just with the loved one struggling with the substance use disorder, but with their other children as well. With the aid of current research reflecting the changes in parenting, launching, and active involvement in treatment, case studies, and worksheets, this workshop explores the concepts of parenting, healthy boundaries, surrender, forgiveness, and other tools available to propel families towards a healthier than norm outcome.

 

378. The Body as First Responder: Using MindShield (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Sidoli, MSW, MBA
Supported by: True North Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

MindShield is an integrated clinical intervention for trauma that is based on evidence-based modalities such as CBT, MI, Seeking Safety, mindfulness, and in the clinical environment is a set of strategies with a trifold focus on the client, the therapeutic encounter, and the therapist’s experience (in and out of sessions). Mindshield sees those as separate and interconnected systems and defines systems as the individual, family, groups and collective environments and within one’s biological, mental, emotional, and spiritual experience. In the clinical encounter, Mindshield supports the conditions to eliminate potential treatment barriers and ruptures of the therapeutic relationship by promoting integration within the individual and dyad. In sessions, Mindshield promotes clients’ self-actualization, holistic awareness and treatment ownership. Mindshield for clinical settings also seeks to enhance your unique clinical expertise as an adjunct method. It is explicitly designed to help you as a frontline provider. It is what you wish your psychotherapy would have given you to support your human experience.

Sober Living Workshop

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

380. Building Quality Recovery Housing Capacity (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Sazha Ramos, MSW
Jason Jarreau, NCPSS
Tim Westbrook, MS
Supported by: SAFE Project, Oxford House, Inc., Camelback Recovery

Level of Instruction: All

Sober Homes may vary in multiple ways. As a community, we need to adopt and promote language that is inclusive while maintaining the integrity of specific populations served by any location.

  • Collegiate Recovery Housing
  • Priority Populations (LGBTQ, Veterans, Gender Specific, Sex Offenders, Reentry)
  • Recurrence of Use Intake & Discharge Protocols
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) housing, Medication Monitoring v. Management

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM Registration is Open in Diego Rivera

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

400. Take the Guesswork Out of Comprehensive Healthcare: Importance of Diagnostic Evaluations in Pain Recovery, Complex Medical Cases, and Treatment Resistant Clients (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
James Flowers, PhD, LPC-S
Supported by: J. Flowers Health Institute

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Comprehensive diagnostics evaluations gather 360 degrees of vital information about an individual’s strengths and challenges, resulting in what can be called a living MRI. Co-occurring disorders such as addiction, mental health, chronic pain and other complex bio-psycho-social problems are at epidemic numbers. Hasty or uninformed clinical decisions for treatment and therapy, often result in misdiagnosed and untreated symptoms. CDE’s provide multidisciplinary diagnostic testing, pinpointing and often co-occurring difficulties. The clinician will learn what team is required for a full picture of the client’s health medically, psychiatrically and psychologically. Substance use, trauma and spiritual evaluations are several other evaluations discussed, giving attendees opportunity to learn clinical techniques in one’s practice. Clinicians will understand how the use of standardized testing techniques such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, as well as other diagnostic tools, assist in practice skills.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

450. Cultivating Learned Optimism Through Action (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jean Campbell, LCSW, SEP, CPC, CIPP, TEP
Supported by: BraveHeart Retreats

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Helplessness is learned, and if recovery is to going to be sustained, it needs be unlearned, and eventually shifted to Learned Optimism. Through the use of Positive Psychology, Sociometry, and the Psychodramatic techniques of Sculpting and the Empty Chair, we will explore Learned Helplessness and the process of shifting it to Learned Optimism. Participants will be educated on effective interventions for helping clients somatically feel into a sense of greater empowerment and optimism and assist them in moving forward on their path of recovery.

 

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  • A very hopeful, healing and transformative experience!


  • We find the leaders in our field at WCSAD.


  • The best conference in my 30+ years in the field.


  • WCSAD is the only national addiction conference we exhibit at annually because it meets all of our objectives – more awareness, lead generation and networking.


  • A Disneyland of information, empowering us to improve our common goal in the field of addiction disorders.


  • As a first-time exhibitor and sponsor, our team enjoyed maintaining and securing new connections while having fun.


  • Intimate clinically-driven, great conference.


Latest tweets @C4recovery

C4 Events is offering a special webinar series dedicated to issues surrounding COVID-19. Join us for the next webinar on May 7 with Vaughn M. Bryant, III, PhD, LMFT-S, LPC-S, LCDC-CCS from @JFlowersHealth. Register now - https://www.c4events.org/webinars/.
#COVID19 #behavioralhealth