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2019 Agenda will be available in early 2019. You may view the 2018 Agenda below.

 

7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM WCSAD Golf Tournament
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Flores Foyer
1:30 PM – 4:30 PM Exhibitor Set Up
5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Fiesta Ballroom
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Hors D’oeuvres and Opening Reception in the Exhibit Hall
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM An Exhibition of Creative Art Therapy in Exhibit Hall

 

Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

100. Healing Emotional Wounds through Storytelling using Psychodrama
Mary Bellofatto MA, LMHC, NCC, CEDS, CP, TEP
Supported by: Onsite

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Stories need to be told. Trauma touches every human being and it is impossible to heal what we are unable to acknowledge. Emotions are the barometer of credibility and authenticity. Psychodrama is a useful tool in the healing of emotions and finding new possibilities beyond the trauma. Storytelling through psychodrama helps our client access both hemispheres of the brain. The left brain, holds memories and information of cause and effect reasoning, verbal processing, linear thinking, and puts words into feeling states and perceptions. The right brain or non-linear, holistic (big picture) thinking, is where we store intense emotion, body sense, social awareness, and interprets non-verbal communication, image, theme, and sense of personal self. The communication needed to assess and share a coherent narrative requires that both sides work together. Psychodrama allows clients to access a greater number of appropriate roles, helping them re-own and recapture the disconnected and disowned part of their self.

 

101. Wellness and Ethics: Addiction Professional Know Thyself!
Pete Nielsen MA, CADC II
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory

We will explore the practical application of ethics in counseling and therapy in working with SUD clients, Additionally, the importance of-managing compassion fatigue will be explored, along with suggestions for maintaining wellness. We will review and code of ethics of CAMF, NASW, APA, CCAPP, NAADAC, and ACA.

 

102. Effecting Change through the Use of Motivational Interviewing: Interactive Training for Skill Development
Grant Hovik, MA
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Motivational interviewing, a treatment approach developed by William Miller, has been well established as an effective way to promote behavior change in individuals. Following a brief review of the fundamental MI principles, processes, and micro-skills, this experiential MI Skill Development training will focus on helping individuals in substance use, mental health, and allied health settings to engage in change talk, and then make commitments to make health behavior-related changes based on goals that they have identified. Ample time will be devoted to “real play” practice to enable participants to gain skills necessary to elicit change talk from clients with low levels of readiness for change, thereby increasing levels of motivation and moving them toward action to address their substance use issues.

 

103. Advancing Women Leaders in Behavioral Health: Master Class 2 – Powering Up Your Leadership Mindset
Cherlyne Short Majors, PhD
Julie Chesley, PhD
Suzanne Lahl, MSOD
Supported by: The Willow Institute, Pepperdine University, and SyncUp Leadership Group

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Are you ready to release the powerful YOU that will take you to the next level of effectiveness in your organization?
Attend this 6-hour session to identify and optimize your most powerful capabilities for leading.
Master Class 2 addresses the unique and exciting challenges of developing one’s personal approach to power. The behavioral health industry needs women leaders with expanded mindsets – where bold, innovative, transparent thinking is driven by relational, collaborative and compassionate action.
As leaders, we believe the most important resource you have is YOUR LEADERSHIP MINDSET?In this experiential and highly interactive session, you will:

  • GET TO KNOW YOURSELF AS A LEADER – Find out what collection of beliefs, values, assumptions and experiences inform how you interpret the world, how you relate to power in yourself and others, and how you take action.
  • HOW YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE is perceived and received by others
  • ARE YOU STUCK IN A MINDSET that is holding you back?
  • ARE YOU READY FOR MINDFUL SELF-LEADERSHIP?

If Leadership, Self-Discovery and Powering Up to be the Best You is what you crave to move your life and career forward, join women from across the country in this Master Class that includes: educational content, self-assessments, discovery exercises, sharing in trios and quartets, and large group dialogue.

Participants will leave the experience with practices they can immediately put in place. If you thrive learning from and with other women, this is an event not to miss.

Led by noted organizational consultants, educators and coaches, Suzanne Lahl, MSOD, and Julie Chesley, PhD, this 6-hour session will leave you re-energized and powered up, and ready to face new challenges for expanded creativity, tenacity, agility, risk-taking, meaningful contribution and authentic collaboration in organizations.

ABOUT THE WILLOW INSTITUTE: OUR MISSION

The WILLOW Institute was founded upon the belief that the future of behavioral health depends upon women leaders sharing the reins of power and participating fully in the transformation of the industry. Our purpose is to unite and advance women in their leadership careers through training, support, coaching and mentoring opportunities.
The WILLOW Institute excels in its pursuit of excellence, professionalism and collaboration. Dr. Cherlyne Short Majors and other women leaders will share their powerful personal beliefs, behaviors and wisdom-generating practices they put in place as they advanced into very influential positions in the behavioral health industry.

Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

125. How and Why Complex Trauma and Dissociation Confounds Interventions and Treatment for Addictive Disorders
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ICRC, ATR-BC, REAT
Heather Hayes MA, LPC, CIP, and CAI
Supported by: Heather Hayes and Associates, Inc.

Level of Instruction: All

It is common sense that the prevalence of dissociative identity disorders (DID) is greater in those who are substance or process dependent than the general public. Four studies reveal a range of 15 % to 39 % of those with substance use disorders also qualify for a dissociative identity disorder (Sar, 2011, p. 4). In fact, substance disorders qualify as a high-risk populations for DID.

Too often symptoms of dissociation are mislabeled as problems with substance use. Dissociative symptoms include, but are not limited to, problems with focus & attention, identity confusion, depersonalization, derealization, & amnesia. If, for example, amnesia is confused with a substance use black out by the interventionist/therapist then problems of trust and confidence, miscommunication, therapeutic impasse and therapeutic conflicts emerge that are able to sabotage recovery.

This presentation offers a basic introduction of the clinical information pertinent to this complicated clinical phenomenon.

Intensive Learning Afternoon Workshops

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

150. Pharmacotherapy for Addictive Disorders
Gerald Shulman MA, MAC, FACATA
Supported by: C4 Recovery Foundation

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will begin with information about relapse rates with patients who are addicted to various mood-changing substances and how the treatment field has fallen far short of their goals for patients. A model integrating psychosocial treatment, recovery support services and pharmacotherapy will be presented as a way to enhance treatment outcome and recovery. Current FDA approved medications for the treatment of opioid, alcohol and nicotine dependence will be presented with the benefits and disadvantages of each. Integration of pharmacotherapy with psychosocial treatment will be discussed included relationship to treatment planning including the patient who agrees to pharmacotherapy but refuses psychosocial treatment. The controversies about the use of pharmacotherapy in general and as applied with particular medications will be discussed.

Art Show and Opening Hors d’oeuvres Reception in the Exhibit Hall

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

C4 Events is excited to announce an Exhibition of Creative Art Therapy as a way to highlight our Creative Art Therapies for Trauma and Addiction series of workshops. The series consists of lectures, workshops and a panel discussion featuring some of the top clinicians and thought leaders coming together to illuminate the integration of behavioral health and creative self-expression in treatment. The Exhibition can only be viewed during the Opening Reception of the 9th Annual WCSAD. Please come celebrate with a delicious hors d’ oeuvre reception in the Fiesta Ballroom.

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

199. Internet Addiction: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment Considerations
David Greenfield, PhD
Supported by: C4 Recovery Foundation

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will attempt to address the theory, research, and clinical/treatment issues associated with Internet Addiction and Internet Use Disorder. There will be an introduction to the etiology, neurobiology, epidemiology and clinical/treatment implications of managing this growing process-addiction. We will review some of the broader psychosocial and neurobehavioral aspects of the Internet as a mood-altering behavior and how the unique characteristics of the Internet promote compulsive use and addictive patterns. We will also discuss the specific addictive aspects of the Smartphone, along with distracted driving. Time permitting, we will review treatment strategies; Q&A.

 

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7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
5:45 PM – 6:45 PM Onsite Workshops Meeting

 

Join TPAS at WCSAD

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

Treatment Professionals in Alumni Services (TPAS) is dedicated to sharing proven best practices for supporting treatment center alumni in their recovery efforts. In the addiction treatment
industry, there is much talk about Recovery Oriented Systems of Care (ROSC) that offer a comprehensive menu of services to meet our clients’ needs. Alumni Services or Recovery Support Services are poised to be an integral part of this recovery paradigm conversation. Join the TPAS meeting and learn how alumni programming and activities can be integrated into the continuum of care at your treatment organization. Whether you already have an alumni program or are thinking about starting a program, take advantage of this opportunity to network with your alumni professional colleagues.

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

201. To Disclose or Not to Disclose? An Update on HIPAA and 42 C.F.R. Part 2
Michael C. Barnes, Esq.
Supported by: DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

For patients who are actually addicted or who have survived a recent overdose, their health care providers and loved ones are often in a prime position to ensure that they receive proper treatment and supportive services. However, health care providers are often uncertain as to what, when, and how they may disclose protected health information (PHI) without the patient’s consent to other providers and loved ones involved in a patient’s care. This presentation, led by an experienced health care attorney, will discuss the limits of health care provider authority to disclose PHI without consent under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and 42 C.F.R. Part 2. The presenter will also provide a timely update on HIPAA and Part 2, including a discussion of the privacy-related recommendations of the President’s Commission on Combating Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, proposed federal legislation, a review of SAMHSA’s Final Rule regarding changes to Part 2 that went into effect last year, and the impact of such changes on treatment programs’ procedures for obtaining and disclosing PHI.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 1)

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

203. Employment Law 101: Best Practices for Employers
Zachary Rothenberg, Esq.
Kristina Sherry, Esq.
Supported by: Nelson Hardiman and Behavioral Health Association of Providers (formerly AATA)

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The addiction treatment industry is not immune from the rigorous and often convoluted laws and regulations controlling the employment relationships. Employment law simply is not a place where you can take chances or try to “wing it.” One bad decision with the wrong employee can lead to administrative headaches, costly litigation, or worse!

This seminar will give you the basic “nuts and bolts” background to navigate the complicated waters of employment and, at the very least to know when you are in over your head and need to call your lawyer. Key employment law topics to be covered will include:

– best practices for hiring;
– the nature of the working relationship (e.g., employee vs. independent contractor and exempt vs. non-exempt status);
– wage and hour obligations (including overtime, meal periods and rest breaks, vacation and sick pay)
– reasonable accommodation for disabled workers;
– best practices for terminating employees; and
– non-compete and non-solicitation agreements

Friday All Day DOT/SAP Workshop (DAY 1)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

204. SAP Qualification and Requalification
Steven Garnham, MEd, LEAP, MAC, LAPC, CADC, SAP
Supported by: Experience Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Certificate in Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Course

8:45 AM – 9:45 AM

205. Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Part One
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers (formerly AATA)

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

In this course you examine the fundamental questions, “What is addiction treatment marketing?” and “How is addiction treatment marketing distinct from marketing in general?” With legal and marketing experts as your guides, you explore key issues related to compliance and enforcement, including the stakeholders, relevant healthcare laws, potentially abusive practices, as well as fees, reimbursements and services. You also consider best practices related to outreach, referrals, and building trust and relationships with patients, families, and other treatment professionals.

• Introductions
• What is addiction treatment marketing and why is it so important?
• Evolving issues in addiction treatment
• Understanding relevant terms
• Understanding Relevant health care laws
• Understanding laws and enforcement stakeholders
• Q&A

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday All Day ASAM Workshop

10:45 AM – 5:45 PM

224. The ASAM Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Course: Includes Waiver Qualifying Requirements KEY
Soraya Azari, MD
Supported by: American Society of Addiction Medicine

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Buprenorphine waiver training is available for providers interested in seeking their waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in office‐based treatment of opioid use disorders. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, physicians are required to take eight hours of training and NPs/PAs are required to take 24 hours of training. Following trainings, providers who have successfully completed the course, may apply to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to obtain the waiver. PCSS‐MAT urges all providers who complete the course to submit a Notice of Intent Form to SAMHSA to obtain your waiver to prescribe. The waiver must be completed online and a link to the online form will be provided to participants following the training. The course is split into an online portion and an in‐person portion. Attendees are expected to complete the online portion of the course before attending the in‐person training.

“Funding for this initiative was made possible (in part) by Providers’ Clinical Support System for Medication Assisted Treatment (5U79TI024697) from SAMHSA. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speaker`s and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organization imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.”

ACCME ACCREDITATION STATEMENT: The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT: The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

225. Personalized Detoxification and Treatment medication management – understanding how genetics influence the choice of medications used throughout the Recovery process
Zahra Kashi, PhD
Supported by: Kashi Clinical Labs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Pharmacogenetics uses genetic variation to predict individual differences in response to medications and holds much promise to improve treatment of addictive disorders. The manner by which medications are processed in the body will vary according to each individual’s DNA. Our genetic makeup determines the nature of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver, the method by which medications are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, eliminated from body, and the receptors upon which medications work – or fail to work. Even members of the same family will sometimes react very differently to the same drug, with one person receiving an inadequate dose and another afflicted with toxicity.

Because addiction patients commonly have accompanying physiological and behavioral co-morbidities, it is critical to know how they process the medications prescribed. Pharmacogenetic testing will guide the selection of the right dose for the right medication, increasing the chances of getting it right the first time.

 

226. When Coping Kills: Applying Exposure Therapy to Eating Disorders & Addiction in Patients with Pre-Existing Anxiety
Andrea Kulberg, PhD
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

An expert in the comorbidity of anxiety disorders and other mental health disorders will review the central behaviors that grow and maintain anxiety, and explain why the patient with an anxiety disorder is help-rejecting. Interactive case examples will be used to demonstrate the power of Exposure with Response Prevention therapy to reduce anxiety and related relapse risk in persons with addictions and eating disorders.

 

227. Marijuana Use: What Behavioral Health Providers Need to Know
Andrew Kurtz, MA, MFT
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States and beyond. Changes in marijuana policies across states legalizing marijuana for medical and/or recreational use suggest that marijuana is gaining greater acceptance in our society. Thus, it is particularly important for people to understand what is known about both the adverse health effects and the potential therapeutic benefits linked to marijuana. This session will feature an in‐ depth discussion of marijuana and its effects, marijuana’s impact on health, the use of medical marijuana, and strategies for working with patients who use marijuana. In addition, participants will learn about the prevalence of and dangers associated with the emerging use of synthetic cannabinoids (a.k.a., “Spice,” “K2”).

 

228. The Future is Here: Medication Assisted Treatment or Treatment Assisted Medication
Pete Nielsen, MA, CADC II
James Herndon, PA-C
Michael Parr, MD, FASM
Stephanie Trumm, RN
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: All

MAT is pharmacotherapy used to support treatment and recovery efforts for people seeking to overcome addictive disorders. It combines prescribed medications with counseling and behavioral therapies, monitoring, community-based services, and recovery support. This provides the client with a comprehensive treatment approach for the bio-psychosocial condition known as addiction. As suggested in its name, MAT is designed to assist, not replace other treatment and recovery efforts.

 

229. The Use of Art-Based Genograms in Addiction Treatment
Deborah Schroder, MS, ATR-BC, LPAT
Supported by: Southwestern College

Level of Instruction: Introductory

We will explore the amazing information that appears when we invite clients to create art-based genograms. Examples and client experiences will be shared as we look at the use of symbols and metaphor as vital to the exploration of the family beliefs, spoken and unspoken rules, and family strengths and challenges, that have been passed down through generations. Participants will be invited to create their own simple art-based genograms in order to understand the power of this experiential activity. It is an opportunity to see the influential family members, the good and the difficult relationships, and the patterns that suddenly become visible, in family history.

Historical and cultural information surfaces as family stories, myths and ways of being in the world, appear in the art.

No prior art making experience is necessary in order to participate in this presentation.

 

230. Adventure Therapy: More than Games
Ricardo Santiago, LMHC, MS
Nicky Treadway, LMHC, NCC, MA
Supported by: AION Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Adventure therapy is an emerging treatment model focusing on physical activity, nature environments and specially designed experiential activities to engage clients in novel and practical ways. This approach involves specially designed experiential activities designed to develop metaphors to facilitate deeper exploration of client challenges, elicit powerful emotions, and provide opportunity to practice coping skills and develop insight in a real-world environment. This workshop will introduce the major concepts of adventure therapy, illustrate the clinical methodology, present research findings on its effectiveness and illustrate application to substance abuse treatment. This workshop will involve some activities/games in addition to didactic/lecture.

 

231. Holistic Addiction Treatment for Emerging Adults
Roger Watts, PhD, LSW, MAC, LADC, CCJS
Supported by: Gray Wolf Ranch

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The Gray Wolf Ranch treatment model for co-occurring substance use and mental illness is based on humanistic therapy theory and practice in both individual and group modalities in a residential setting. Using a combination of person-centered therapy, focusing on the development of positive relationships based on recovery from co-occurring disorders, together with an experiential wilderness program, residents are able to repair personal maladaptive responses to stressors in their environment. Making solid and useful connections to the recovering community at large is part of the core curriculum. 12 Step programming, holistic psychological treatments, small group dynamic theory and medication-assisted care form the elements of this care around the relationship-building nucleus.

Certificate in Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Course

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

232. Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Part Two
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers (formerly AATA)

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

• Potentially abusive practices
• Florida model
• Insurance procurement
• Bed vouchers and paying for housing
• Urine drug testing
• Capping/steering
• Out of scope services
• Strategies for reducing risk
• Q&A

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

250. Building a Quality Program from the Inside Out
Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC
James Flowers, PhD, LPC-S
Moderated by Jeff Skillen
Supported by: BRC Recovery & Driftwood Recovery Center

Level of Instruction: All

Industry thought leaders, Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC, and James Flowers, PhD, LPC-S, share their experiences with building quality treatment programs from the inside out. From timely topics to relevant business practices, this moderated discussion will provide you with real-life insight and current programming strategies used in nationally accredited treatment facilities to meet the ever-changing needs of today’s population(s) seeking treatment.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 2)

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

251. Don’t Be an Easy Target: How to Avoid Practices that Get Addiction Treatment Facilities into Trouble
Kathryn Edgerton, Esq.
Supported by: Nelson Hardiman

Level of Instruction: All

The explosive growth of addiction treatment providers has been wonderful from the perspective of expanding access to care for people who need treatment. However, it has also attracted bad actors and unethical activity such as paying for patients, waiving financial responsibility, procuring insurance, and deceptive and illegal marketing practices. This activity is increasingly in the spotlight and has drawn attention from regulators and law enforcement. This program examines widespread practices that raise serious potential risk issues for addiction treatment programs. The presentation will focus on understanding and navigating the legal and compliance risks facing addiction treatment programs. It will provide practical operational recommendations on how to avoid becoming a target of payor and government investigations and highlight approaches to structuring business relationships appropriately and ethically.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

253. Use of Psychotropic Medication During Pregnancy
Neeraj Gandotra, MD
Supported by: Delphi Behavioral Health Group

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The presentation will discuss treatment of pregnant woman using psychotropic medication including the benefits and risks involved. The participants will gain an understanding of how psychotropic medication can help woman who are pregnant cope with mood disorders. This presentation will dispel many of the concerns and myths that providing psychotropic medication to pregnant women is contraindicated. The presentation will discuss psychotropic medications that are not recommended for pregnant women and those medications that are safe to use.

 

254. The Basics of Anger Management
Anita Avedian, MS, LMFT, CAMS-IV
Supported by: Anger Management Essentials

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

In this workshop, participants will learn how to implement an anger management program into their practice or treatment program. They will receive an overview of anger and aggression, and will learn the specific skills and tools to teach clients for the different issues pertaining to anger.

 

255. Separating the Person from the Disease: Identifying Eating Disorders as a Dual Diagnosis
Vicki Berkus, MD, PhD, CEDS, iaedp
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will familiarize the substance abuse therapist to the diagnosis, treatment and recovery options for their patients with a dual diagnosis of eating disorders. They will learn how to recognize physical and mental signs of anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder in their patients. The therapist will be challenged to look at their own issues around these subjects and how it impacts the therapeutic alliance. We will cover the various stages of treatment available and the criteria needed to enter each of these levels of treatment.

 

256. Methamphetamine: Effective Assessments and Behavioral Interventions
Andrew Kurtz, MA, LMFT
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The purpose of this session is to provide participants with a detailed overview of methamphetamine use. Key topics will include the epidemiology of methamphetamine use in the United States and locally; how methamphetamine works in the user’s brain and body and consequences of use (acute and chronic effects, effects on cognition, and memory), treatment outcomes research, and effective behavioral interventions for individuals with methamphetamine use disorders.

 

257. Creating an LGBT Affirming Organization
Kristina Padilla, MA, IMF, LAADC, ICAADC, CGS
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop provides an opportunity for Clinicians, Counselors, Doctors, Nurses, and Allies to assess where their organization are in consideration to incorporating LGBT issues into their work. Participants will identify the need for LGBT affirmative policies and procedures in a organization’s structure. The workshop will outline ways in which an organization can plan and implement effective training program targeted toward engaging LGBT Clients and improving services delivered to them. Participants will understand the need for alliance-building and strategies for doing so effectively. This curriculum was developed from ATTC, YMSM, and LGBT.

 

258. Positive Art Therapy: Integrating Positive Psychology and Art Therapy in Dual Diagnosis Treatment
Rebecca Wilkinson, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Supported by: Creative Wellbeing Workshops

Level of Instruction: All

This lecture will review core principles of positive psychology and art therapy, and illustrate the theoretical and practical applications of adopting a Positive Art Therapy approach to working with clients with dual diagnosis. Specific strategies for working with clients with substance abuse and psychiatric concerns will be explored. The lecture will highlight the capacity of the creative process to increase positive emotions, manage affect, to induce engagement and flow, and to identify and create meaning.

 

259. The Role of Parents in Young Adults Sustaining Recovery
Diana Clark, JD, MA
Supported by: Turnbridge

Level of Instruction: All

While technically of adult years, many young adults who struggle with Substance Use Disorders and other co-occurring disorders lack the tools and capacity to cope with the demands of recovery and other life challenges. As a result, parents often fill in the gaps of their young adults’ functioning and unwittingly promote continued dysfunction and regression. This session discusses how to engage parents in the treatment and recovery process and the relevant information and support they need to stop “over-functioning” and instead, focus on family recovery. Through the use of a PowerPoint presentation, case studies and worksheets, presenters lead the group to understand the importance of family involvement and the methods to successfully engage parents in the recovery process.

Certificate in Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Course

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

260. Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Part Three
John Mills, Esq
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers (formerly AATA)

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

• Potentially abusive practices (continued)
• Fees, reimbursement and services
• Preauthorization/verification of benefits
• Waiving patient financial responsibility
• Integration of professional services
• Strategies for reducing risk
• Q&A

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

276. DBT for Substance Use Disorders: Advances in a Novel Approach to Helping Clients Struggling with Chronic Emotion Dysregulation and Addiction
Steven Rudoy, PsyD
Supported by: Clearview Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Substance abuse frequently co-occurs with Borderline Personality Disorder and chronic emotion dysregulation and may cause heightened symptoms in either disorder. The co-occurrence of the two disorders can cause severe emotional dysregulation, increase the probability of relapse and poor treatment outcomes, and increase the risk of suicide. DBT for Substance Abuse pushes for immediate and permanent abstinence, while also teaching that a relapse, should it occur, does not mean that the patient cannot achieve the desired result. Learn how this well researched modality is used to help clients struggling with substance abuse and bring home some DBT skills that can be taught to your clients.

 

277. “Be the Change You Wish to See: 10 Principles for a Bolder Model of Eating Disorder Prevention
Michael Levine, PhD
Supported by: Kenyon College and La Ventana

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This presentation examines how clinicians can contribute to the prevention of eating disorders. As a framework for this presentation, the audience is invited to engage in a critical evaluation of 10 principles that are the foundation for application of the Bolder Model of Prevention developed in the late 1990s by Lori Irving and Michael Levine. This model draws heavily from a feminist sociocultural approach, which integrates the professional (e.g., clinical, research), the personal (what individuals can do and be) and the political (e.g., activism, advocacy, and social justice) aspects of prevention work.

 

278. Going to Pot, or Pot of Gold, the Impact of Legalized Recreational Marijuana
Sherry Daley, MA
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

On November 8th, the countdown began for the implementation of a seismic shift for youth treatment in California. Its passage will impact treatment, education, and prevention throughout California and sets a model for legalization measures throughout the nation. While the State of California wrestles with managing the start-up of the legal marijuana industry, addiction treatment advocates and policy makers are laying the groundwork for maximizing the revenue allocated by the voters. This workshop will cover these areas: What is contained in the Initiative? What do the revenue sections say and what do they mean? An update on the unified recommendations developed by AOD/MH stakeholders; the mechanics of how and where the revenue should go. Lessons learned from the lottery, Proposition 36, and Proposition 63; the tools to make Proposition 64 do what it was meant to do. An advocacy primer; what can be done to impact outcomes.

 

279. Uncloaking the Master: Using Multi-Modal Creative Processes to Understand Addiction
Nina (Anin) Utigaard, MA, MFT, REAT
Supported by: International Expressive Arts Therapy Association (IEATA)

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will provide examples, case studies and creative processes that can be utilized in working with individuals dealing with substance abuse and addiction. We will explore first hand, how the arts: drama therapy, music therapy, art therapy and other creative modalities can be beneficial in helping clients express, explore and understand the fabric and map of their addiction. The workshop will be offered in a Person-Centered approach and will be both didactic and experiential. The best way to understand how the creative process can be helpful in working with substance abuse, is to experience yourself. No prior arts experience required.

In this workshop participants will learn:

1) How expressive arts therapy can be beneficial in addiction treatment;
2) The basics of the Person-Centered approach;
3) The basics of expressive arts and multi-modal therapy;
4) The benefits of finding alternative ways for addicts to share their internal process.

 

280. The Steps We Took: The 12-Steps In Action
Jean Campbell, LCSW, TEP, CIPP
Supported by: Cycles of Change Recovery Services

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Unlike writing exercises, the 12-Steps in Action Model provides us with an opportunity to explore the steps through action modalities such as sociometry, sociodrama and psychodrama, allowing for a deeper understanding and integration of the 12-Step process of Uncovering, Discovering and Recovering. In this didactic and experiential presentation, attendees will be introduced to the 12-Steps in Action Model and will be provided with specific clinical tools that they can take back to the work with clients and their families.

Certificate in Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Course

4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

281. Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM) Part Four
John Mills, Esq
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers (formerly AATA)

Level of Instruction: All

• Cultivating and maintaining relationships
• Building trust with patients and families
• Building reputation and brand
• Strategic and ethical marketing best practices
• De-stigmatizing the disease
• Sound internet marketing strategy
• Differentiating yourself from the competition
• Value and importance of education and certifications
• Q&A

 

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7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM COPE Meeting

The Coaliton of Physician Educators on Substance Use Disorders (COPE) Meeting

The Coalition On Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders (COPE) Meeting: Please welcome the Coalition On Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders while they host their meeting during WCSAD. COPE was formed in 2009 to support and assist medical school faculty in their efforts to teach medical students about the nature of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use disorders and to ensure that medical students receive appropriate training in the skills they will need to prevent, screen for, diagnose and treat substance use disorders (SUDs) in their future patients, regardless of their medical specialty, practice type or location. This year’s meeting has a special focus on educating medical students about safe and effective opioid prescribing, as well as the care of patients suffering from opioid use disorder.

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

300. The Dirty Side of Detox: Realities of Assessing & Treating in the Detox Trenches
Rick Campa, MD
Gwendolyn Casella
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop provides a unique perspective on a wide variety of detox issues while addressing the many challenges that come with complicated detox cases. With over 39 combined years of experience in the detox trenches, the presenters offer their hard-earned experience and education, in addition to humor, in this session geared toward addiction professionals. Attendees will be both entertained and informed on some little-known tricks of the trade, including effective ways to keep clients safe, tips for maintaining a drug-free detox unit, and how to raise the industry standards of client care.

Saturday All Day DOT/SAP Workshop DAY 2 (Must have attended Day 1)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

301. SAP Qualification and Re-qualification
Steven Garnham, MEd, LEAP, MAC, LAPC, CADC, SAP
Supported by: Experience Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 3)

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

302. Tightening the Reins: An Update on Legislation and Enforcement Affecting Residential Treatment Programs and Sober Homes
Michael Barnes, Esq
Supported by: DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: All

As the opioid overdose epidemic reaches new heights in the U.S., state and federal lawmakers and regulators are increasingly focusing their attention on the addiction treatment industry. This presentation, led by an experienced health care attorney, will provide a timely update on legislation and enforcement trends that could impact your program. Topics will include recent state legislation related to residential treatment, sober homes, and marketing professionals; state and federal warm hand-off legislation; and local, state, and federal enforcement trends.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

325. Lipstick and Leadership – The Benefits of Empowering Female Leaders in the Addiction Treatment Industry
Ilana Zivkovich, LCSW, LCDC, CDWF
Emily Bielen, BS
Supported by: Northbound Treatment Services and WERQ Leadership Services

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Sheryl Sandberg has encouraged a generation of women to “Lean In.” Multiple exposés have unearthed the significant wage gap that persists between men and women. A multitude of public declarations have been made extolling the benefits of giving both genders a seat at leadership tables. Yet within the behavioral healthcare industry and across sectors, women continue to struggle to access and wield professional power consistent with their male counterparts. This presentation explores this phenomenon as well as the structural, inter-personal and intra-personal components of gender bias. Tenets of narrative therapy and the work of Dr. Brené Brown are utilized to illustrate how the stories we endorse about ourselves shape our experiences and opportunities. Strategies to maximize access to personal and professional power are explored, providing participants with the opportunity to deepen insight, identify personal areas of strength and needed growth, and to develop as leaders in the addiction treatment field.

 

326. Screaming on the Inside: Metacommunication of Self-Destructive Behaviors
Erica Ives, MA, MFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: All

All self-destructive behaviors can serve as a way to communicate. They speak the unspoken. Every eating disorder, addiction, and other self-destructive behavior has a voice, a story, a thought and a feeling that the sufferer is trying to express, but the deeper they go, the more disconnected they become. Eating disorder sufferers often don’t feel like they belong, fit in or have the ability to navigate what seems like a scary and chaotic world. We as providers need to learn how to explore and understand the self-protective nature of the self-destructive behavior to help our clients learn and integrate new healthy coping skills.

 

327. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Relapse Prevention (RP) Strategies Training
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The purpose of this interactive workshop is to provide participants with a detailed overview of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and relapse prevention (RP) strategies. Part I will focus on the underlying principles of CBT and RP, including an introduction to CBT and RP and how the behavioral interventions are used in the treatment of substance use disorders; the principles of social learning theory; the principles of classical and operant conditioning; the 5 W’s – functional analysis, including demonstration/practice conducting a functional analysis. Part II will focus on the specific elements of CBT, including the trigger-thought-craving-use sequence; identifying triggers in high- and low- risk situations and the neurobiological understanding of cravings. Part III will focus on instructing participants on methods for using CBT strategies, including explanation of treatment provider role in facilitating CBT sessions; how to conduct group and individual CBT sessions; principles of using CBT; creating a daily recovery plan.

 

328. Family Dynamics of Addiction
Rosemarie Wheeler, LMFT, LAADC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This workshop will focus on the importance of educating the entire family rather than just the addict. The family dynamics sometimes can fall through the cracks of addiction when the addict is the only focus. Virginia Satir and Claudia Black are pioneers in the family theories and in helping families come together. Exhibiting how family roles can become skewed during the addicts whirlwind and how the family can be educated in order to bring peace and harmony back to the home. It is important for families to understand that it takes the whole family working together over many months of sessions and groups.

 

329. Sacred Spaces Everywhere: Creating Containment
Rebecca Sledge, LPC-MHSP, ATR
Supported by: Cumberland Heights

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will introduce participants to a variety of art therapy directives and interventions to create containment and safety. After a brief overview and education around art therapy, attendees will be given the opportunity for an experiential exercise to better understand how they can implement and apply interventions most effectively. As a group, we will discuss any personal experiences that bring new awareness, questions or clarity and plan how to implement interventions.

 

330. Working with the Addicted Family System
Janet Fluker, LPC, CPCS
Supported by: International Association of Family Addiction Professionals (IAFAP)

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The purpose of the workshop is to educate and provide tools to clinicians who encounter families impacted by addiction in their private practice or agency. We will discuss the symptoms and behaviors families develop when living with an addicted loved one. We will then look at four assessment tools that can be used to develop a treatment plan for the family. Participants will be given a vignette of a family to discuss in groups and develop a treatment plan together. We will then discuss appropriate interventions for all four of the Stages of Family Recovery including how to work with different family attachment styles. We will end the workshop by honestly looking at the difficulty of working with this population and how supervision and support is necessary for the clinician.

 

331. Transitioning in Treatment: Understanding Gender with Action
Beck Gee-Cohen, MA, LADC
Supported by: BGC Consulting

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

More people are feeling safer coming out as transgender than ever before. We are seeing more transgender clients in treatment than ever. So now what? When a client informs us they would like to transition or are in the midst of transitioning when they come to treatment, we may freeze. We may not know what to do and we may need help. This session is geared toward cisgender clinicians who may be working with transgender clients or will be working with transgender clients in the future. This session will be experiential in nature, will give clinicians a better understanding of themselves as it relates to their transgender clients, and will offer helpful hints to be more prepared and comfortable working with the trans population. If you are ready and willing to get up and experience gender, clinical work and your own bias, then this is the session for you.

 

332. PsychoNeuroPlasticity and Addiction Recovery
Barbara Peavey, PhD
Supported by: Origins Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Principles and practices of psychoneuroplasticity in addiction treatment will be explained. Intentionally adding dimensions of brain health will be explained, as well methods of brain training to help heal, enliven, and direct the brain will be covered.

Saturday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

350. Integrating the Creative Arts into Addiction and Trauma Treatment
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ICRC, ATR-BC

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The lecture includes an overview of the creative arts psychotherapies, (with definitions, research, and practical interventions for addiction and trauma), illustrated with slides of art and poetry by clients and students. This lecture is based upon peer review journal publications by Dr. Scott for UCLA 1999, Haworth Press/Taylor Francis 2006, and Oxford University Press (Oxford University article is – in press – 2017), as well as 32 years of professional practice. The lecture includes a structured literature review. A preliminary version of this lecture was used to teach medical doctors participating in the Andrew Weil, MD, associate fellowship for integrative medicine at the University of Arizona for eight years.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 4)

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

351. Organizational Health: Growing Sustainable Culture For Behavioral Treatment Providers
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Supported by: C4 Consulting

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

With rapidly changing conditions of the behavioral health market, the greatest asset of any organization is often prioritized the least: Organizational Health. This presentation will offer perspective into the historical landscape of organizational health challenges from the providers’ perspective. We will examine common organizational behaviors, habits, and responses to systemic health challenges exhibited by treatment providers, and explore solution-oriented approaches to growing a sustainable culture of progressive organizational health.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

352. Nutrition for Addiction Recovery: Exploring Links Between the Gut and Brain
David Wiss, MS, RDN
Supported by: Nutrition in Recovery

Level of Instruction: All

The prevalence of substance use disorders continues to rise with a significant impact on families, communities, and the healthcare system. The current opioid crisis suggests a need to re-assess entrenched treatment protocols for addictive disorders. Classically, treatment includes mental health services such as psychopharmacology and individual and group therapy sessions. There is little data about the role of physiological recovery particularly nutrition during early recovery. It is well known that substance use disorders are associated with neglected health including nutritional deficiencies. There is recent evidence linking the gut and brain, suggesting that proper dietary intake is critical for mental health. Substance use disorder treatment protocols may benefit from including nutrition services as a treatment modality.

 

353. The Politics of LGBT And Trying To Force It Into A Clinical Model
Manny Rodriguez
Eddie Hunt, LMFT
Nina Firooz, LMFT
Ian Jensen AMFT
Supported by: La Fuente Hollywood Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The first part of this workshop will begin with a historic review on how and why LBGT became a political movement and how this decision offered an opportunity to create a much needed “strength in numbers” culture to a very marginalized group of individuals. The second part of this workshop will discuss how LGBT, as a clinical model continues to present great opportunities but even more challenges in the treatment setting. The presenters will review, compare, challenge and present cases that will hopefully prompt discussion regarding if the political movement is suitable as a clinical model.

 

354. I am Not My Addiction: Reframing Cognitive Distortions Using Out-of-the-Box Interventions
Sharon Volner, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop gives practical applications for clinicians to use out-of-the-box interventions to break down clients’ negative automatic thought patterns that hinder progression, sobriety, and stability in daily functioning and quality of life. Geared toward therapists, clinical supervisors, interventionists, counselors, program administrators and other stakeholders providing direct care to programs and clients struggling with addiction, this session highlights unique and effective Cognitive Behavioral Interventions that you will not find in a textbook.

 

355. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment approaches are utilized in a variety of care settings. SBIRT has been shown to be effective in primary care settings, where it is incorporated into other routine medical assessments such as measuring blood pressure. It has been proven particularly effective in hospital emergency departments and trauma centers with individuals with alcohol‐ related injuries. This training focuses on screening procedures to identify risk; key motivational interviewing concepts and principles that are tied to effective use of the FLO (Feedback; Listen and Understand; Options Explored) brief intervention; and referral to treatment for patients with more serious substance use‐ related problems.

 

356. CBT and Relapse Prevention
Bob Tyler, BA, LAADC, CADC II, ICADC
Supported by: Bob Tyler Recovery Services

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The craving cycle happens to nearly all alcoholics and addicts in recovery and typically precedes relapse. These two facts should inform counselors that learning to proactively avoid the craving cycle is preferable to waiting for the craving to surface and trying to effectively intervene before relapse occurs. This lecture utilizes CBT principles in educating participants on how clients can avoid the craving cycle and, thus, minimize relapse potential. While most counselors can aid clients in identifying their relapse triggers, many do not adequately explain the mechanism by which an event becomes a trigger. Consequently, the only way for a client to deal with triggers is to learn and practice avoiding them. Given that alcohol and drugs permeate our society, this is a strategy doomed to failure. Knowing what makes a trigger a trigger enables clients to engage in a systematic trigger recovery process which is pivotal for effective relapse prevention.

 

357. Clinical and Organizational Applications for The Creative Arts Therapies
Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC917, ICRC, ATR-BC, REAT
Deborah Schroder, MS, ATR-BC, LPAT
Rebecca Wilkinson, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Nina (Anin) Utigaard, MA, MFT, REAT
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP, ATR
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC, ATCS, CCLS
Supported by: Private Practice Malibu, Southwestern College, Creative Wellbeing Workshops, International Expressive Arts Therapy Association, and Cumberland Heights

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

A panel of leaders and experts will delve into the clinical, ethical, cross cultural and operational issues related to the creative arts therapies as applied to dual diagnoses treatment. Panelists will offer dialogue with a range of perspectives, regarding the underlying paradigms of the creative arts therapies. Selected applications of the creative arts therapies embedded within dual diagnoses treatment, including the emerging trends in evidence-informed practice, will be illuminated. There will also be a discussion of professional issues, practitioner and organizational, that often arise as part of an interdisciplinary treatment team. The panel will also review key operational issues in developing, designing, and implementing a creative arts program into private practice, intensive outpatient and residential treatment programs, which will include a discussion about ethical guidelines and insurance reimbursement.

 

358. “You’re Doing Fine, Right?”: The Adolescent Siblings of Individuals with Substance Use Disorders
Cyn Clarfield, PsyD

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Research suggests having a family member with a substance use disorder has negative impacts on both physical and mental health, yet the siblings of such substance users have been largely excluded from scientific research and literature. As a result, little is known about how adolescents experience the impacts of a brother or sister’s addiction to substances. This workshop highlights a 2017 study of adolescent well-siblings, which found these siblings experienced profound emotional and relational impacts, including stress, anxiety, sadness, and anger as a result of the trauma, betrayal, and grief associated with a sibling’s addiction. A comparison of the results to existing research on adult well-siblings suggests the negative impacts experienced by adolescent siblings continue into adulthood. Results challenge the misconception that siblings of individuals with substance use disorders are “doing fine.” This is an opportunity for researchers and treatment providers to expand their knowledge on this largely underrepresented population.

 

359. Atypical Case finding: Screen and Assessment Strategies for High Risk Populations
Norman Hoffmann, PhD
Albert Kopak, PhD
Supported by: C4 Recovery Foundation

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This presentation will provide pragmatic tools for screening SUD, PTSD, and depression in addition to efficient diagnostic assessment strategies in various populations with high prevalence of substance use disorders. It will focus on those who typically are not identified for possible treatment admissions. Data from recent arrestees in a jail will illustrate how screening and assessment principles can be applied and how data from such assessments have implications for public safety and public health. Findings from recent arrestees demonstrate a shift from alcohol to opioids and stimulants as the most prevalent substance use disorders in this high-risk population. Related to this trend, about one in three recent arrestees reported injecting drugs on a regular basis – a serious public health issue. This presentation will describe how comprehensive yet efficient assessment procedures can also be applied to other high-risk populations such as hospitalized medical patients. Policy implications will also be provided.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

375. Mindfulness as a bridge to 12-step recovery
Stefan Bate, BA, MA, LAC
John Bruna, BA
Supported by: Jaywalker Lodge and Mindful Life Program

Level of Instruction: All

Mindfulness need not be an alternative to 12-step treatment, indeed, it is an effective and viable bridge to a sophisticated 12-step treatment protocol that meets the needs of divers client populations. In today’s treatment landscape, critics of 12-step recovery argue that the 12-step approach is limited and fails to meet the needs of complicated clients with co-occurring mental health challenges. Often, “evidence based” practices steeped in mindfulness centered cognitive behavioral interventions are offered as a replacement to more traditional addiction therapies. The goal of this workshop is to help practitioners understand that the fundamental concepts and essence of mindfulness are inline with those of 12-step approaches and can, in fact, be a bridge for clients who struggle with accepting 12-step recovery. This workshop will provide participants with mindfulness and 12-step based tools and protocols that will help them engage in any addiction treatment setting, 12-step or otherwise.

 

376. Forgiveness as an Essential Tool for Recovery
Kristine Nutt, LCSW, LCAS
Lyndon Harris, MDiv
Supported by: Elements Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Lily Tomlin once said that “Forgiveness means giving up all hope of a better past.” Nowhere is this truth more relevant than for those who are in recovery from addictions. The first step in recovery is acknowledging that there is a problem – a clear-sighted admission that all is not (yet) well. The courage to acknowledge and accept our history of brokenness is a first and vital step toward healing. Once acknowledged, there are abundant tried and true psychological, scientific and spiritual techniques available to aid in moving forward. It is imperative that the person in recovery and his/her family system employ multi-level forgiveness interventions, in order to find true and lasting healing. This workshop will introduce the Stanford Forgiveness Methodology advanced by Stanford University professor, Dr. Frederic Luskin, and to provide a forgiveness toolkit for counselors working with individuals and families dealing with addictions.

 

377. Brain Injury: Assessment, Identification and Treatment Planning
Deborah Whitney BS, ADV and Timothy Murphy PhD
Supported by: Pure Recovery CA

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Impulsivity, addiction, memory impairment, dementia, mood disorders, rage, depression, suicidal ideation are just some of the consequences associated with brain injury. Understanding how the brain is impacted and how it can change executive function, behavior, sleep and personality disturbances (apathy, depression, irritability, impulsiveness and motor neuron disease is critical when a establishing a treatment plan. Obtaining a complete medical history, cognitive baseline can alter treatment and placement decisions. At this workshop we will help you connect the dots between brain injury behavior and addiction.

 

378. DBT and ACT: Blending Two Treatment Models for a Comprehensive Approach Towards Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders
Gregory Holich, MS, LPC
Supported by: Timberline Knolls

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This presentation will focus on the relevance of incorporating the principles and skills from both Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Acceptance & Commitment Therapy. The natural synthesis of these two approaches can enhance therapeutic interventions with clients struggling with substance abuse disorders and co-occurring disorders.

 

379. Coming of Age in a Violent World: The Impact of Trauma On the Developing Brain
Julia Rose Polk, BA, MA, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

What are the ways in which exposure to or experiences of violence affect the brain’s development from infancy thru early adulthood? How does a culture of violence create cognitive dissonance that perpetuates violent communication and behavior with self and others? Can one exist in a violent world and not be traumatized? This presentation will bring to the forefront that which we know about the relationship between violence, trauma and substance and behavioral addictions, and will be a larger call to action for creating peace in our communities.

 

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7:00 AM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

400. Spiritual Self-care in Trauma Informed Treatment and Clinical Supervision
Joseph Rogers, MDiv
Adam Richardson, MDiv, MA
Supported by: Refuge Recovery Treatment Centers and CeDAR (Center for Dependency, Addiction and Recovery)

Level of Instruction: All

Trauma and secondary trauma is our everyday reality, we live and work in the midst of it. SAMHSA’s protocol for Trauma-Informed Care incorporates spirituality explicitly in self-care and notes that “a strong sense of spiritual connection can enhance counselors’ resilience and ability to cope.” Commitment to spiritual self-care in clinical practice and supervision is essential to the health and well-being of clinicians. Our spiritual health affects our clients and their families. This workshop focuses on learning skills to stay spiritually healthy as you work with traumatized clients and their families. We will provide resources and methods and encourage significant participant interaction to practice skills in this area, learning to better attend to meaning, purpose, belonging, identity, heritage, and hope in patient and supervisory care.

 

401. Treating Medical Complications of Eating Disorders: A Mind, Body, and Spirit Approach
David Hernandez, MD
Corinne Zemliak, LVN
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: All

Eating disorders are complex bio/psycho/social/spiritual entities causing distress to the body, mind, and spirit. The fact that eating disorders are usually ego syntonic results in delayed diagnosis due patient’s denial of their compromised state and reluctance to seek help. Once a diagnosis is made, treatment is difficult, due to medical complications and co-occurring disorders. The complexity of recognizing and treating eating disorders makes it all the more important for providers to be aware of the signs and symptoms. Making the diagnosis requires knowledge of eating disorders and establishing a therapeutic relationship. Treatment involves restoring compromised biological systems, providing nutritional, psychological, and pharmacologic support. Integrating holistic modalities is a vital part of treating the whole person and helping them achieve lasting recovery. It is important for providers to stay abreast of the latest advances in eating disorders to best serve their clients.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

500. Neuroscience for Non-scientists: The Brain Targets for Medication Development
Andrea Barthwell, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: Treatment Management Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) defines substance use disorders (SUD) as primary, chronic diseases of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, this is reflected as an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors despite consequences. Addiction is progressive and can result in disability or premature death. As we attempt to develop strategies and treatments to prevent use, intervene on early use, and improve treatment, knowledge of the neuroscience can improve our ability to respond effectively, with compassion.

When treating the sub-set of SUD, Opioid Use Disorders (OUD) the question as to whether to use medication assisted treatment (MAT) or not must be answered. The Opioid Crisis has unleashed an unyielding fury on the U.S. that is spreading world-wide. In the U.S. a tepid, uncoordinated response has created a situation of “failure to identify” and “failure to treat,” leaving many young, full of potential individuals, dead in its wake. Trying to respond has forced us to identify use along a continuum of severity met with increasing intensity of interventions that attempt to marry public safety to public health strategies, treat the derangement of the disease, and support long-term care in the community.

Treatment of the derangement offers a choice of one of three strategies which each have their merits, supporters, and perceived strengths. They are to: 1) make a decision to repair impaired receptors (receptor restoration); 2) fill the receptor with a molecule that allows the receptor to stay in the “on-on” position while blocking most response of attempts to use, thus maintaining dependence on the underlying substance (the substitution patch); and 3) using competitive blockade to impede, obstruct, or stymie , the effect of the desired drug, thus frustrating attempts to use (arrest use). In this session you will be given an overview of medication development as a response to evolving neuroscience and an opportunity to explore what underlies your desire to use or support each of the three strategies of MAT.

 

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  • Wonderfully scientific, applicable and well-presented addiction conference. Will attend next year. Thank you!


  • ***** Five-star event


  • The C4 Recovery Staff is amazing -everyone works so hard to make sure it is a great experience for all attendees.


  • WSCAD 2016 was one of the best events I've ever attended. Looking forward to next year!


  • I look forward to this conference all year! It remains my very favorite! Thank you for making it a wonderful time of networking and education. It is now like a reunion for me.


  • This was a hot conference, and I don't mean the weather! (Palm Springs in June)


  • Top level instructors teaching "cutting edge" information at a beautiful and historic resort.


  • We find the relationships we build and the knowledge we gain from C4 Conferences are invaluable.


  • I thought this was one of the best conferences that I have attended in the past few years. It was very well planned and the accommodations/venue was simply the best! Overall EXCELLENT experience!


  • This is my FAVORITE conference, awesome attendees, wonderful breakouts, great exposure for our program.


  • C4 conferences are a part of our company's yearly schedule. We feel that you create the best conferences and we make it priority to attend as many as we can each year.


  • WCSAD is one of the highlights of my year, both professionally and personally.


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