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7:00 AM – 7:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM WCSAD Golf Tournament
10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Exhibitor Set Up
5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Fiesta Ballroom
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Hors D’oeuvres Reception in the Exhibit Hall

 

Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

125. Wellness and Ethics: Addiction Professional Know Thyself! (6 CEs/CMEs)
Pete Nielsen, MA, CADC II
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

We will explore the practical application of ethics in counseling and therapy in working with SUD clients. Additionally, the importance of managing compassion fatigue will be explored, along with suggestions for maintaining wellness. We will explore working with special populations such as LBGTQ2+, adolescents, mandated clients and older adults. We will review and code of ethics of CAMF, NASW, APA, CCAPP, NAADAC, and ACA.

 

126. Recovery Connections – Stages of Nurturing for an Integrated Journey (6 CEs/CMEs)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Michael Dinneen, LCSW, CSAT, CAC III
Supported by: C4 Consulting, Inc.

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This experiential workshop will help attendees develop tools to help the people they serve from stage I to stage II recovery. True connection and intimacy cannot be fully realized without healthy attachment. Facilitators will describe the process of healing relationships and growing spiritually through experiential therapies such as EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy) attachment work. As a robust recovery maintenance approach, increased resiliency and dynamic wellness emerge in the therapy process. EFT is a systems approach and contemporary treatment approaches show greater success when systemic issues are addressed, specifically through attachment work from the beginning of recovery. The greater attention given to understanding family systems-based attachment work for clients, the greater likelihood for clarity of relapse trigger identification, stabilization of recovery across the client support system, yielding an integrated and diversified recovery growth. Attendees will develop insight into integrating traditional recovery modalities and attachment work through experiential exercises and practice throughout this workshop to further their own professional development & wellness.

Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

130. The Issues Live in Our Tissues (3 CEs/CMEs)
Nikki Myers, MBA, C-IAYT, SEP, ERYT500

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop presents a framework for relapse prevention that includes the cognitive approach of the 12-step program, the trauma healing approach of Somatic Experiencing and the body-based approaches offered by yoga and mindfulness practices. Utilizing material from ancient texts, trauma research as well as information and data from modern neuroscience studies, we will discuss exactly how combining the cognitive and somatic approaches can support changes in brain patterning. This holistic framework, based in the theme, ‘The Issues Live in Our Tissues’, presents a holistic relapse prevention model that support compassionate awareness, change and healing.

Intensive Learning Afternoon Workshops

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

135. Is This Social Anxiety? Or Do I Not Know How to Be in Social Situations Without a Substance? (3 CEs/CMEs)
Anita Avedian, MS, LMFT
Supported by: Anger Management Essentials

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This presentation will focus on some social challenges people face when they are in recovery, specifically as it relates to social anxiety. Oftentimes the social aspect was not an issue because the use of alcohol or another substance since it lowered their inhibition. During sobriety, some people realize they have fears surrounding being judged or not knowing what topics to discuss. During this workshop, we will review understanding social anxiety, and treatment strategies to help clients become more comfortable with people.

Opening Hors d’oeuvres Reception in the Exhibit Hall

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

199. Treating Chronic Pain During the Opioid Epidemic (2 CEs/CMEs)
Mel Pohl, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: Las Vegas Recovery Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

From 1999 to 2017, almost 218,000 people died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids. The prescription of, misuse, and addiction to these drugs have surpassed marijuana and are decimating a generation of Americans. Heroin use and overdoses deaths are on the rise as well. This epidemic was born in another epidemic: Chronic Pain. This session will review how we got to this point, the nature of the epidemic, pain treatment and addiction, and solutions for changing course at this crucial time.

 

Back to Top

7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

 

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

200. Beyond Mindfulness and Trauma Informed Care – Instituting Long Term, Systemized Treatment Protocols to Support Life Long, Sustainable Recovery (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Holly Daniels, PhD, LMFT
Stephen Dansiger, PsyD, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Treatment for substance use disorders and other addictive behaviors continues to evolve. Mindfulness practices are now widely used in all types of treatment settings, and accreditation and government agencies now mandate that treatment include trauma-informed modalities. Although these changes have been positive and have helped many, long-term recovery rates are still low, especially 2 to 3 years out of treatment. This session will outline the importance of integrating trauma-focused protocols with long-term lifestyle support to help clients capitalize on gains and avoid self-sabotage.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

205. A New Enforcement Reality: Best Practices in Light of the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act (H.R. 6) (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Kathryn Edgerton, Esq, CHPC, CIPP-US
Supported by: Nelson Hardiman, LLP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The SUPPORT Act takes sweeping aim at the opioid crisis. Providers of addiction treatment and recovery services should pay careful attention to Section 8122 of the Act entitled “Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act of 2018,” which makes it illegal to pay for patient referrals and to offer to pay for patients’ transportation or to waive or discount fees to induce patients to receive addiction treatment services. The Act imposes prison sentences of up to 10 years and fines of up to $200,000 for violation of this section. The Department of Justice is dedicating additional enforcement resources to address the opioid crisis. This program will (1) provide addiction treatment providers with the resources necessary to recognize marketing and operational pitfalls, including activities that are now illegal, (2) explain best practices for compensation relationships with employees and independent contractors providing marketing services to your facility, and (3) explain how addiction treatment providers may legally assist patients who have financial hardships with transportation and the costs of treatment.

Friday All Day DOT/SAP Workshop (DAY 1)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

215. Substance Abuse Professional Qualification and Requalification (6 CEs/CMEs)
Steven Garnham, MEd CADC MAC CEAP LEAP LAP-C
Supported by: Experience Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

225. Clinical Collaboration & Care Advocacy in the Courtroom (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jeffrey Merrick, Esq.
Sharon Volner, MS, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This breakout session will provide participants with the presenters’ best practices and practical experience in reaching better outcomes for our recovering clients with legal issues. Best recovery outcomes come from stronger care advocacy and clinical collaboration between treatment program, attorneys and the courts. The presenters will share their unique perspective as clinician and attorney/interventionist, providing specific strategies, current trends and case examples based on their in the field collaboration. Participants will be challenged not only to help our clients succeed in the courtroom, but to translate the external motivators of a given court case or intervention into success in treatment. This success is measured not just in our clients’ recovery, but in building stronger and more effective treatment practice and strategies.

 

226. Dealing with Difficult Patients (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Kurtz, LMFT, MA
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC)

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The purpose of this interactive, case-based training is to introduce participants to strategies that can be used to best deal with patient crises, and difficult or hard to engage patients. Strategies for addressing such issues as suicidal ideation, the impact of Axis II personality disorders, boundaries, transference, counter transference, inappropriate behavior, and other client-clinician relationship type issues are discussed. Participants are encouraged to share past and present work-related experiences with handling such situations.

 

227. The Application of Emotional Intelligence and Mindfulness in Addiction Treatment (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Evan Amarni, MS, LAADC-CA, ICADC, CIP
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: All

Addiction has evolved over the years and as such our ability to treat it needs to evolve. Emotions are a very powerful force and our relationship to them can either lead to a successful recovery or a life ridden with anguish and suffering. This session will cover the foundation for applying Emotional Intelligence and Mindfulness in the treatment of substance use disorders and assisting people to cultivate emotional balance with the understanding that if we have more influence over our emotions, we can intervene on them before having a destructive response, such as relapse.

 

228. Unveiling “The Mask”: Creative Inquiry for Addiction (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Nina Utigaard, MFT, REAT
Supported by: International Expressive Arts Therapy Association

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

“Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask and he will tell the truth.” – Oscar Wilde. Perhaps Oscar was on to something. In this exploratory presentation and workshop, attendees will learn about the power of mask-making in addressing addiction and substance abuse. Through case studies, examples and an actual mask-making experience, those in attendance will acquire a first-hand understanding of the power of the creative process in addressing addictions and substance abuse issues. Mask-making, in particular, provides a less threatening way for the client dealing with addiction (or other issues) to explore their addictive self and/or other aspects of their personality or history that may be sabotaging their sobriety and struggle with addiction. The experiential will be offered in a Person-Centered approach. No prior art experience required.

 

229. Understanding the Links Between Trauma and Addiction (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Tamarah Gehlen, LMFT, LADC, CCTP
Supported by: StepUP at Augsburg University

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

In this session, attendees will learn about the links between trauma and addiction. We will examine the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, and will look at developmental trauma, brain research, grounding and therapeutic techniques to be able to assist clients and will examine how to have more meaningful connections with clients. Alternative views on addiction will be examined, and client-centered versus client-considered care will be discussed.

 

230. Leveraging Interventions to Support Treatment Goals – A Collaborative Approach (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Eric McLaughlin MSW, ASW, CIP, CCMI
Kenneth Seeley, CCMI-M, CIP, CTP, CATC

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Often times therapists don’t fully understand the intervention process and miss out on key information and support that can help. Often times there is also a sense of mistrust between interventionist and treatment center where either side feels adversarial. We need to help bridge the differences between interventionist and therapist to help foster collaborative action to help.

 

231. Motivating the Substance Use and Eating Disorder Co-Occurring Patient (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Linda Lewaniak, LCSW, CAADC
Supported by: Eating Recovery Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

42.7% of those struggling with substance use disorder will also have a co-occurring disorder such as binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, mood, and anxiety. And yet, many of these individuals are either undiagnosed or not ready to confront another recovery process. There are many different stages of change when in the process of recovery: pre-contemplative, contemplative, and determination/pre-preparation. Linda Lewaniak, LCSW, CAADC guide the audience through motivational interviewing techniques to best support the client at the stage they are currently at in the recovery process. The tools outlined by Lewaniak include reflective listening, empathy, and developing discrepancies to best intervene and provide treatment options for the co-occurring population wherever they are at in the process.

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

250. Navigating the Challenges of Maintaining focus on Clinical Excellence while Managing Financial Stewardship (1 CE/CME)
Tina Depaolis, PHD, LMHC, CAP, CCJAP, CRRA
Supported by: Sovant Healthcare Systems

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The Behavioral Healthcare Industry is on the threshold of taking on one of its biggest challenges ever — financial stewardship. The topic is now in the forefront of, not only the Behavioral Healthcare Industry, but on the national political and media stage as well. Wherever you turn, you hear about the runaway train that is healthcare costs. On a per capita basis, the U.S. will spend twice as much as any other industrialized nation. In 2015, the healthcare bill will be over $3 trillion, about 18 percent of our gross domestic product. Achieving these goals in operating healthcare services must allow the organization to maintain effective best practices standards in clinical care while simultaneously setting, tracking, and achieving its key business strategies and objectives. Maneuvering the systems within behavioral healthcare such as human resources, EMR, clinical systems and financial realities are a delicate balancing act not for the weak of heart and can take, to a large degree, an enormous amount of finesse. In addition, organizations must set strategies, goals, objectives and tactics towards meaningful changes or improvements, making sure they are congruent with the mission and philosophy of the organization, as well as reflective of financial bottom lines. This training will include an interactive discussion between the CEO and Chief Clinical Officer on how to balance the ongoing challenges of providing best practices and maintaining healthy financial revenue.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

251. Enforcement and Regulatory Risks Facing CEOs, Managers and Physicians of Addiction Medicine Clinics (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Robert Liles, JD, MBA, MS
Supported by: Liles Parker, Attorneys & Counselors at Law

Level of Instruction: All

Marketing activities that would normally qualify as ordinary business courtesies if extended to an actual or potential source of referrals in other industries, are often illegal in the context of Federal health business programs. In this session, we will discuss whether a number of common marketing practices comply with Stark and the Federal Anti-kickback Statute. We will also examine various State laws that must be considered before an addiction treatment center engages in marketing.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

255. “What Was Your Childhood Like?” Examining & Targeting the ACE Elephant in the Room and Substance Use (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Valerie Kading, DNP, MSN, PMHNP-BC
Supported by: Sierra Tucson

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Childhood is the canvas on which events are experienced and impact health over the entire life span. Childhood abuse and trauma set the stage for negative health outcomes and early death. Identification of Adverse ACEs through screening and assessment are critical to addressing substance use. Through the use of complex and engaging movie protagonists (hero) and antagonists (villain)and various media platforms, the audience will be challenged to identify who is at risk for substance use and negative health outcomes through ACE assessment and will also be guided to an ACE score through an ACE questionnaire. The audience will be challenged to confront stereotypes of individuals experiencing negative health outcomes by analysis of ACEs and protective factors. Integrative and evidence-based treatment modalities will be presented to prepare the clinician and organization to address substance use through the trauma lens.

 

256. Getting Comfortable in the Unknown: Gender & Sexuality in Treatment Settings (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Beck Gee-Cohen, MA, LADC
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

We only discuss gender and sexuality when we talk about LGBTQ people. What would it look like if we talked about sexuality and gender with ALL of our clients? How do we even begin the conversation? Most of our conversations never get started because we are uncomfortable talking about it. What if we had a space to talk about the uncomfortable, get vulnerable with what we don’t know, ask the questions we are afraid to ask? This workshop will be all about how we start talking about gender and sexuality with our clients. How to show up for them in their most vulnerable space with our most authentic self. Learning about our own bias and our own transference is the best way to do best by our clients. We will dive into the topics we have been afraid to address, and we will do it together.

 

257. Synthetic Drugs (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Kurtz, LMFT, MA
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC)

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Unlike major illicit drugs of abuse, such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, or marijuana, synthetic drugs have only appeared on the street in the last few years. Because they are constantly changing, our knowledge of synthetic drugs is not as comprehensive as we would like. The purpose of this workshop is to provide multi-disciplinary behavioral health practitioners with a detailed overview of synthetic drugs, most notably substances known on the street as K2, Spice, and Bath Salts. Part I of this session will define key terms, describe the major classes of commonly available synthetic drugs, discuss the acute and chronic effects of synthetic drug use, and available data on the extent of use. The session will also review the neurobiology of synthetic drug use and provide information on how to identify and assess synthetic drug users. It will conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical implications of synthetic drug use.

 

258. Therapeutic Communities ” Do These Modalities Still Work” (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Alan Johnson, LMFT, LAADAC, SAP, CCPS
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will examine the history, evolutions and future of the Therapeutic Community, and if this method of treating Substance Use Disorder is still effective and successful in treating today’s populations affected with addiction. We will look at different populations and how to integrate these principles into traditional treatment settings such as evidenced base and 12 step practices. In addition, this workshop will assess the future of this form of treatment a can it still exists with the basic elements that made this approach highly regarded and practiced in the early 1960’s.

 

259. Strategic Integration of Art Therapy for the Treatment of Complex Trauma (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Elizabeth Davis, MFA, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Supported by: Trauma Institute & Child Trauma Institute

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will demonstrate how to integrate creative arts therapy into the three phases identified by ISSTD, (International Society for the Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation), for the treatment of complex trauma and dissociation. Adult and adolescent and cases and art will be discussed with focus on building resources, attachment repair, ego state exploration, and trauma resolution. Application of art therapy will highlight the special qualities of creative exploration for enhancing confidence and a feeling of control, the use of an art object as a container for positive and negative affect, developing mentalization, (as defined by Peter Fongay, Phd terms), and for externalizing distress. Specific scripts will be provided to help guide therapist’s success.

 

260. One Recovery, Many Paths: How to integrate Nature-Based Traditions into your Treatment Plan (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Renee Baribeau, BA
Supported by: Foundations Recovery Network

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Nature-based traditions and practices have been shown to help people with substance use and co-occurring disorders heal and navigate long-term recovery. Evidence based nature practices are derived from the applied practice of the emergent field of ecopsychology, developed by Theodore Roszak. Nature based therapeutic practices stem, in part, from the belief that people are part of the web of life and that we are not isolated or separate from our environment. Ecopsychology is informed by systems theory and provides individuals with an opportunity to explore their relationship with nature. The Four Cardinal Winds are persistent structures used for organizing human experience, as evidenced in early cave art and worldwide mythology. Presenter will demonstrate a brief guided journey experience, which will allow participants to pinpoint their bearings and quantify their experience using her tool called the Awakening Compass, developed with symbols from seven ancient wisdom traditions. Attendees will explore transformational tools based in ancient wisdom teachings, designed to nourish mind, body, heart, while acknowledging the spirit’s unlimited capacity to heal.

 

261. ADHD and Substance Use Disorders: Practical Steps to Understanding and Improving Treatment (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Laura Linebarger, PsyD
Supported by: Resolute Recovery, LLC

Level of Instruction: All

The effective treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in conjunction with co-occurring Substance Use Disorders has long plagued professionals, their patients and families. Psychostimulants are the most common treatment modality but often contribute to the cycle of relapse. Untangling these issues can be a long and arduous road. Dr. Laura Linebarger is an expert in the treatment of substance use disorders, process and behavioral issues, and ADHD in adults. This presentation illustrates the nuanced differences between the symptoms of each issue, describes the regulatory interactions between ADHD and substance use, and offers a balance of practical strategies and tools for managing symptoms of ADHD while navigating the process of recovery at different stages.

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

275. Treating the Link Between Traumatic Experience and Opioid and Other Substance Use Disorders by Using the Somatic and Cognitive Reprocessing Approach (SACRA) (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Romas Buivydas, PhD, LMHC
Supported by: Spectrum Health Systems

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This session discusses perhaps the most common link between those suffering from opioid addiction and a history of trauma, and an innovative therapeutic technique called the Somatic and Cognitive Reprocessing Approach (SACRA). Traumatic, or adverse, life experiences can lead an individual to struggle with PTSD. That, in turn, can lead to wanting to escape from the pain of flashbacks, nightmares, and reliving the traumatic experiences. Substances such as opioids may seem like an escape from the pain, but they only worsen the situation by leading to addiction. Treating the link between trauma and Opioid Use Disorders and other SUDs with SACRA by applying somatic-based EMDR techniques followed by cognitive-behavioral based DBT techniques, to may be a very useful new tool in a treatment providers toolkit.

 

276. Secrets to Lighting Your Fire Again: The Road to Burnout Avoidance (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jennifer Enriquez, AMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: All

This presentation will cover 4 main objectives. First, defining what is compassion fatigue. Second, it will analyze the shocking health care statistics, stages, causes and the Implications of compassion fatigue. Third, learning how to identify and scale your own compassion fatigue using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Lastly, using information from the American Institute of Stress, it will increase skills for prevention of compassion fatigue using the ABCs (awareness, balance and connections).

 

277. Art Therapy & IFS: Compassion for Parts with Collage (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Supported by: Art Therapy Collective

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The Internal Family System model of psychotherapy (Schwartz) develops internal cooperation, fostering “self-leadership” using eight internal resources: compassion, clarity, connectedness, courage, confidence, calmness, curiosity, and creativity. Art Therapy and IFS integrate beautifully, both containing Jungian concepts such as active imagination. Basic concepts, case studies, and theoretical concepts along with a short cartoon film will provide an overview of IFS. Participants will deepen understanding and enhance their internal processes through an art experientials using collage, that facilitate self-compassion, so needed in addictions and trauma work. Clay work will be seen in presented casework. Participants will practice the IFS techniques of dialoging and “unblending’ among their inner parts through their own art, thereby facilitating a somatic understanding of the IFS concepts. The presenter offers a framework for applying these creative interventions with various populations. Bring your curiosity and creativity! This workshop does not count towards IFS certificate training. IFS is an EBT with SAMHSA.

 

278. Breathwork: Trauma Resolution and Nervous System Regulation (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Nathaniel Hodder-Shipp, BMsc, CADCII
Supported by: Breathwork for Recovery

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Clinicians will receive training in how breathwork can help clients achieve trauma resolution, lessen anxiety, and activate the social engagement system which can lower defensiveness and help them participate in the therapeutic process. Clinicians will also participate in a breathwork exercise, which can combat their own stress, compassion fatigue, and encourage empathic abilities. Voluntary regulated breathing practices have been shown to assist clients in their healing where traditional techniques failed, especially when dealing with trauma. Attendees will be educated in how breathing practices enhance conventional treatments and improve the psychotherapeutic process.

 

279. AA and SMART Recovery: Not as Different as You Might Think (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Tom Horvath, PhD
Supported by: Practical Recovery Psychology Group

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

AA’s powerlessness approach and SMART Recovery’s self-empowering approach appear completely different. However, recent findings about the effectiveness of addiction mutual help groups, and their mechanisms of behavior change, suggest that all groups (12-step, SMART, LifeRing, Women for Sobriety) may be equally effective (Atkins & Hawdon, 2007; Zemore, et al., under review) and may work using similar mechanisms of behavior change (Kelly, 2017). The presentation will disseminate emerging knowledge about the effectiveness of mutual help groups and common group factors, while recognizing differences in approach between each group, with an emphasis on SMART Recovery and 12-step groups. The presentation will propose ideas for increasing respect between mutual help groups, increasing overall group attendance, and helping clients identify and attend any mutual help group. Finally, if participants in their communities do not have available a broad range of mutual help groups, methods for creating more balance will be suggested.

280. Unicorns, Rainbows, and Ponies: Considerations for Clinical work with LGBTQIA2+ Individuals (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Kristina Padilla, MA, LAADC, IMF, ICCADC
Supported by: CCAPP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will provide an overview of using Traditional Treatment Approaches with LGBTQIA2+ populations and how providers need to be aware of harmful treatment practices. We will also discuss the Impact of Homophobia and Racism on LGBT Clients.

We will evaluate why it is so important for providers to work from a trauma-informed approach and lastly how it is helpful for providers to gain insight on how stigma can impact LGBTQIA2+ individuals.

 

281. Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling: An Interactive Group Process for Exploring Bias (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
David Kahn, PhD, LPC
Supported by: The Counseling Center of Florence, LLC

Level of Instruction: All

Our personal bias is not always as evident to ourselves as we would like to think. As counselors who are expected to be non-judgmental and to have multicultural awareness it is imperative to explore how our bias may inform our treatment process. This session will help participants to explore the nature of personal bias and stereotypes. It will be an interactive process where participants will engage in group exercises and discussion about the nature of bias and stereotypes to help explore how personal bias can affect the practice of counseling.

 

Back to Top

7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

300. Why Neuroscience Matters to Psychotherapy (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Louis Cozolino, PhD
Supported by: C4 Recovery Foundation

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Knowing about neuroscience is invaluable for therapists, not because it offers specific new techniques or clinical theories, but because it provides a deeper understanding of the biological power of the “talking cure.” As a social organ, the brain has evolved to be affected and changed by other brains, and psychotherapy relies upon the power of relationships to trigger the neuroplastic processes necessary for learning and growth. In effect, psychotherapists are pragmatic neuroscientists, who alter the functioning and structures of clients’ brains, whether or not those brains are aware of these underlying biological processes.

Sober Living Workshop

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

301. How and Why You Should Measure Outcomes (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Ross Lazar
Peter Connolly, BA
Peter Corbitt, CNT
Valerie Kading, DNP, MSN, PMHNP-BC
Mike Jones
Supported by: One Step, The Haven at College, Awakenings Treatment Center & Fairview Supportive Living, Lighthouse Recovery Texas and Sierra Tucson

Level of Instruction: All

Measuring the outcomes of your alumni post program is becoming more and more important. We can all agree on this, but how do you reach patients and gather data on them after they have left your program? It is crucial to understand the best way to gather data, and how to analyze and revamp your program accordingly.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

305. Alumni & The CEO: The Business Case for a Comprehensive Alumni Program (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Gina Thorne, MS
Supported by: TPAS

Level of Instruction: All

Alumni programs have become a standard feature of most substance abuse treatment programs, largely due to the desire to move from an acute-care model to one of sustained recovery. Yet they remain an understudied area of addiction treatment. This session shares the results of our study of successful alumni programs, with a focus on the benefits they bring to treatment centers from a business perspective. We discuss specific alumni services that have a demonstrable impact on alumni engagement. That increased engagement, in turn, leads to more referrals of new clients by alumni while contributing to positive long-term outcomes. These referrals not only raise the patient census for their centers but also reduce the cost of patient acquisition.

All Day DOT/SAP Workshop: Part II (Attendance of Part I Required)

8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

315. Substance Abuse Professional Qualification and Requalification
Steven Garnham, Med, CADC, MAC, CEAP, LEAP, LAP-C
Supported by: Experience Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Effective January 1, 2004, before you can serve as a Substance Abuse Professional under the D.O.T. Regulations, you must have received 12 hours of qualifying training and then pass a qualifying examination. In addition, those qualified as SAP’s must complete 12 hours of continuing education relevant to the SAP function, including recent updates in the regulations. This course contains the latest information.

PCSS MAT Waiver Training

8:30 AM – 6:15 PM

320. PCSS MAT Waiver Training (8 CEs/CMEs)
TBA
Organized by: American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

Level of Instruction: All

Waiver training is available for providers interested in seeking their waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in office-based treatment of opioid use disorders. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, physicians are required to take eight hours of training and NPs/PAs are required to take 24 hours of training. Residents may take the course and apply for their waiver when they receive their medical degree. Following the training, providers who have successfully completed the course may apply to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to obtain the waiver. PCSS urges all providers who complete the course to submit a Notice of Intent Form to SAMHSA to obtain your waiver to prescribe. The waiver must be completed online and a link to the online form will be provided to participants following the training.

ACCME Accreditation Statement:
The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
AMA Credit Designation Statement:
The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.30

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

325. Shared Factors for Co-Occurring Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders – Neurobiology, Trauma and Attachment (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Carolyn Coker Ross, MD, MPH, CEDS

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Much has been learned in recent years regarding how the brain makes decisions and the interplay between various parts of the brain that result in unwanted behaviors. Nationwide, approximately 20-30% of all individuals with anorexia nervosa and 40-70% of bulimics have co-morbid substance use disorders. For binge eating disorder, substance use disorders are a significant co-occurring diagnosis. Up to one-third of alcohol use disorder female patients may have undiagnosed eating disorders (ED). At any given time, 30% of women receiving treatment for substance use disorders (SUD) may also have a serious eating disorder. The element of cross-addiction speaks to the fact that for many individuals, there may be common etiological factors, including family history of SUD, trauma, attachment disorders and major depression that promote the development and maintenance of both SUD and ED. This shared etiology and its impact on the brain is the subject of this workshop.

 

326. Trauma Integrated Addiction Treatment: What Is It? What Should It Look Like? (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Michael Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC
Supported by: Foundry Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: All

No matter who you speak to in the addiction treatment world, they will tell you that they do trauma informed or trauma integrated treatment. But what does that mean and what should that look like? This presentation will offer a developmental model and a set of axioms that can be utilized in the development of effective trauma integrated treatment. The Neuro Affective Relational Model (NARM) will be proposed as a central organizing theory for assisting clients to work simultaneously with achievement of addiction milestones and resolution of day-to-day trauma symptoms. NARM is a treatment model designed to address developmental trauma, based on somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory and regulation of the autonomic nervous system. NARM developmental themes of connection to self and others, attunement to needs, trusting self and others, autonomy and boundary setting, and the ability for love/sexuality will be highlighted.

 

327. I am Not My Struggle: Rejecting Insecurity and Owning One’s Self Through the use of Out-of-the Box Interventions (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Sharon Volner MS, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This workshop gives practical applications for clinicians to use out-of-the-box interventions to break down clients’ negative automatic thought patterns that hinder progression, sobriety, and stability in daily functioning and quality of life. Geared toward therapists, clinical supervisors, interventionists, counselors, program administrators and other stakeholders providing direct care to programs and clients struggling with addiction, this session highlights unique and effective Cognitive Behavioral Interventions that you will not find in a textbook.

 

328. DSM-5 and ICD-10 Implementation (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC)

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services mandates all HIPAA entities (providers, payers, health plans, clearinghouses, and vendors) begin using ICD-10-CM/PCS (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition – Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System) on transactions for dates of service and inpatient discharges on and after October 1, 2015. ICD codes are used to classify, store, and retrieve diagnostic and procedural information, manage electronic health records, and process claims. The DSM-5 revises the classifications and diagnostic criteria of psychiatric disorders with, in some case, substantial reconceptualization from DSM-IV-TR. To assist clinical and administrative staff in making the transition to DSM-5, this session will present an overview of these changes, including a crosswalk from DSM-IV-TR diagnostic codes and categories to those of DSM-5. The training will focus on using the ICD-10-CM clinical documentation and billing codes allowing time for a discussion of implementation issues and challenges specific to participants’ work settings and roles.

 

329. Psychodrama A Deux: Using Action Methods with Individuals (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jean Campbell, LCSW, CIPP, TEP
Jim Tracy, MA, DDS, LMFT, LAADC, CP, PAT, CIP
Supported by: Cycles of Change Recovery Services

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

While psychodrama and sociometry are typically used in group settings, they can be incredibly effective when working with individual clients as well. In this workshop, practitioners will learn specific action method techniques to help their clients engage in the therapeutic process, build connection and trust in themselves and in their relationships, and reach deeper affect by bringing issues to life. Through the use of sociometry and psychodramatic techniques, clients can be helped to practice new, more effective life skills that can clear away what is no longer working in their lives and move forward in healthier ways.

 

330. TRASHED: Utilizing Junked Materials and Mixed Media to Engage Adolescent and Adults in the Creative Process (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP, ATR
Supported by: Cumberland Heights

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will allow a hands on experiential process and discussion on how to better integrate ‘junk’ into the creative process to engage younger patients with a more tactile, tangible approach to art therapy practices. We will also work with the strong metaphor this provides of turning ‘trash’ into something meaningful and with purpose.

 

331. Change in Action (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Mark Pirtle, DPT
Supported by: “Is Your Story Making You Sick?” – A Lojong Productions Film

Level of Instruction: All

Our personal bias is not always as evident to ourselves as we would like to think. As counselors who are expected to be non-judgmental and to have multicultural awareness it is imperative to explore how our bias may inform our treatment process. This session will help participants to explore the nature of personal bias and stereotypes. It will be an interactive process where participants will engage in group exercises and discussion about the nature of bias and stereotypes to help explore how personal bias can affect the practice of counseling.

Sober Living Workshop

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

332. The Status of Our Industry: How Rehabs and Sober Livings Can Work Together (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Jose Hernandez
Mariah Destruel
Rick Hubbard, LCDC-I
Tim Westbrook
Pete Nielsen, MA, CADC II
Supported by: One Step, Camelback Recovery, Origins Behavioral HealthCare, Riviera Recovery and CCAPP

Level of Instruction: All

There have been a lot of changes in our industry. States are imposing more regulations on sober livings, and different models of sober livings have emerged. Panelists will talk about what changes they have seen emerge, challenges they have encountered and where the industry is heading.

Saturday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

350. The Two Pursuits: Addressing Spirituality in Clinical Counseling (1 CE/CME)
John Dyben, DHSc, MCAP, CMHP
Supported by: Origins Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: All

The concept of spirituality has, for the course of recorded history, been integral to understanding all aspects of humanity. In modern society, spiritually-focused ideas have often been relegated to religious sects or to vague quips put on t-shirts and bumper stickers that seem meaningful at first glance, but which few can explain. This presentation begins by providing a clear definition of spirituality that can be operationalized by anyone on practical levels. Once a definition of spirituality is presented, we explore how this relates to addiction and overall health. Finally, we look at practical applications of these concepts in the work of the professional counselor, therapist, or other helping professional.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 4)

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

351. Evolution of a Trauma Informed Workplace (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Mary Woods, RNC, LADC
Supported by: C4 Consulting, Inc. & Mary Ryan Woods Consulting

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

While significant attention has been devoted to assessment, treatment & prevention of trauma in client care, there is a lag with the evolution of these needs for staff & organizations in the work environment. Staffs & Organizations can experience & create trauma, which often goes unrecognized & unaddressed. Conceptualizing a Trauma Informed work environment for staff requires honesty, openness, & a willingness to embrace conflict. Contemporary healthcare models often lead to compromising care. Recognizing staff’s exposure to trauma in their own lives & through client care can create a workplace environment that supports sustainable & improved health. Organizations that truly practice Trauma Informed approaches produce higher quality care by developing staff skills & resources. Rarely do staff receive attention on developing their own skills & resources to produce a Trauma Informed workplace. This workshop will explore challenges of providing trauma informed care for organizations, emphasizing staff skill & resource development.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

352. Borderline Personality Disorder and Co-Occurring Disorders: Effective Treatment for a Complex Client (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Melissa O’Neill, MSW, LCSW
Supported by: Timberline Knolls

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

We now know that along with accompanying mood disorders, 78 percent of adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) will develop a substance use disorder or addiction at some point. Understanding and addressing this complex comorbidity can make treating these clients less overwhelming. In this workshop, we’ll explore how personal biases toward clients with BPD can affect diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Through experiential exercises and case studies, learn a range of evidenced-based practices, including practical strategies from DBT and ACT, for treating this complex diagnosis.

 

353. Entitlement: A Hurdle to Recovery (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Diana Clark, JD, MA
Supported by: Turnbridge

Level of Instruction: All

Researchers report that the current generation of teens and young adults have higher levels of anxiety and depression than previous generations. While the reasons are myriad, those immersed in the work of substance use disorders report that “Entitlement” and its resultant lack of patience, perseverance, and grit not only contributes to anxiety and dissatisfaction but compounds the problem by making the substance use disorder more difficult to treat. Through the use of PowerPoint aided presentation, case studies, and worksheets, Diana Clark leads the group to understand the historical and familial origins of Entitlement and the ways families can change and dismantle this phenomenon.

 

354. Is your Client in Chronic Pain What’s a Clinician to Do? (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Louise Stanger EdD, LCSW, CDWF, CIP
James Flowers, PhD, LPC
Supported by: Kemah Palms and Cypress Lakes

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Over 133 million American experience Chronic Pain with an annual cost of $635 million dollars. Addiction has become a bedfellow to chronic pain that effects both adults and adolescents. This lively interactive presentation will examine how chronic pain, addiction and mental health issues intersect. Special attention will be given by Drs Flowers and Stanger to how our brains (neurotags) work with respect to chronic pain and addiction. We will discuss the similarities and differences between families who experience chronic pain and addiction. We will identify and describe evidence-based strategies used with Chronic Pain Families and provide clinicians with alternative and complementary modalities that can incorporate into their practices. Case examples will be used to illuminate interventions.

 

355. Pharmacology of Addiction (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
James Peck, PsyD
Supported by: UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC)

Level of Instruction: Introductory

The purpose of this training session is to introduce participants to the pharmacology of addiction. Major topics of discussion include: (1) the impact of drugs on the brain; (2) cognitive and memory effects; (3) major drugs of abuse, with a focus on prescription drugs; (4) medical and psychological effects of alcohol and opioids; (5) medications approved to treat alcohol and opioid addiction; and (6) strategies to talk with clients about their use of psychotropic and addiction medications.

 

356. Working with Families to Support Treatment Outcomes (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Oriana Murphy, MA, CADC-II, LCSW
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Research has shown that family involvement in the treatment process can increase engagement, support longer length of stay, and decrease rates of relapse in. How do we as treatment providers engage the family, increase effective communication with their loved ones, while also setting limits and holding clear boundaries? This presentation aims to identify various types of caregivers and how to effectively work within their family system as an effort to increase treatment outcomes. Time will also be spent focusing on the impact of this work on the treatment provider and ways in which to counteract one’s own limitations.

 

357. Panel Discussion Regarding the Use of The Creative and Expressive Arts Therapies for Addiction, Trauma and Mental Health Professionals (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Tabitha Fronk, LPCC, ATR-BC
Ericha Scott, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT
Nina Utiguaard, MFT, REAT
Elizabeth Davis, MFA, MS, ATR-BC, LCAT
Peggy Kolodny, MA, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Rebecca Johnson, LPC-MHSP, ATR
Supported by: International Expressive Arts Therapy Association, Trauma Institute & Child Trauma Institute, Art Therapy Collective & Cumberland Heights

Level of Instruction: All

Tabitha Fronk and Ericha Scott will co-facilitate a panel discussion amongst Creative and Expressive Arts Therapists. Topics covered will include (1) Clarifying definitions: What is Creative Arts Therapies? What is Expressive Arts Therapies? (2) What particular challenges do Creative Arts Therapists (including Expressive Art Therapists) face in addiction /recovery settings? How could these issues be improved? (3) How do the Creative Arts Therapies complement existing treatment curriculum for people in recovery from addictions, mental health conditions, and trauma? (4) What is your perspective on the significance of training/ certification/ licensure of Creative Arts Therapists who provide services in rehabilitation/recovery settings? (5) Can you describe the clinical scope of practice for Creative Arts Therapists? (6) What areas of research/practice/potential changes do you see as most exciting for future work in the Creative Arts Therapies? Is there any data you’d like to share which is particularly relevant to people in recovery?

 

Sober Living Workshop

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

361. Legal Landscape: Regulations, Revenue and Relationships (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Anelia Shaheed, Esq
Supported by: The Law Office of Julie W. Allison

Level of Instruction: All

The regulatory landscape is constantly changing. Local governments are imposing restrictions on what sober livings need to do to continue to operate. The panel will be discussing: certification of recovery residences; fair housing and zoning; patient brokering; and marketing. Hear from some of the experts in the field about what is currently happening on the regulatory front so you can make sure to stay ahead of upcoming regulations.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

375. Cultural Challenges When Working with First Responders (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Libby Timmons, MEd, LISAC, CEAP, SAP

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop will address the various cultural norms related to providing clinical services for First Responders. First Responders have a unique set of cultural rules and norms that many counselors do not know. My plan for this session is to address the norms and cultural challenges within the First Responder community as well as what they bring to the therapeutic situation. I will bring information in to the program that will assist attendees in finding ways to break down the barriers First Responders and their families bring to the counselor. I will use several teaching tools such as interactive discussion, some experiential exercises that attendees can take back to their work place.

 

376. It’s Not Just My Cell Battery That’s Always Low! Health, Wellness, Research and Self-Care to Prevent Secondary Trauma and Burnout (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Andrew Mendonsa, PsyD, MA, MBA
Andrew Wakefield, MA, LMFT, SAP, SAE
Supported by: Sharper Future

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Overwhelming research highlights that helping professionals are increasingly being exposed to vicarious trauma as part of their work with clients, families, and congregational members. This trauma can diminish the professional’s effectiveness and place the client at risk for harm. By implementing evidence-based interventions, assessments and culturally-informed care, the burnout of staff can decrease, and the overall happiness and wellness of all parties improved. This session provides cutting edge interventions and assessments to help reduce burnout and professional departure.

 

377. Averting Addiction Before It Occurs: Early Detection of Entitlement in Addiction & Fostering Resiliency (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Michael Wetter, PsyD, FAPA
Supported by: La Ventana

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Although addicts don’t necessarily see that they are entitled, they often believe that life is supposed to be comfortable and easy. Stress is an ongoing problem. For people with addiction issues, they have a hard time dealing with problems and use their addiction to cope with the disconnect in their life; this is the intersection between entitlement and resiliency. Successfully managing an addiction includes changing perspectives and accepting that life isn’t fair, it isn’t easy and it doesn’t always work as planned. Full recovery can’t happen until a person learns to be uncomfortable, embrace the uncertainly of life and see problems as an opportunity for growth. This presentation will review how we identify entitlement at an early age (early childhood, adolescence), and skills that practitioners can impart to families to help diminish entitlement, and build resiliency in an effort to improve recovery outcomes, or better yet – diminish the likelihood of addiction overall.

 

378. Moving in Recovery (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Kelli Grock, MS, MFT, LADC, CYI

Level of Instruction: All

Families are often left devastated and dramatically altered by addiction’s impact. While individuals may experience recovery, the family structure and attachments are often impaired. Research suggests that it is critical that all family members receive the benefit of the many new methods for healing. We propose that when mind-body-spirit approaches are utilized within individual and family sessions, long-term recovery is enhanced. Employing more nonverbal and experiential techniques allows emotional connections in families to strengthen and organizing patterns to shift. By assimilating the fundamentals of the recovery philosophy of surrender, acceptance, and responsibility to self and others with the core essence of awareness and consciousness via yogic postures relational healing occurs. This workshop shows how movement-oriented methods pave a path for an integrating of individual and system therapies within a 12-Step paradigm.

 

379. Workplace Substance Use: New Interventions with Relapse Prevention (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
David Lisonbee, BS
Supported by: Twin Town Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Detecting and intervening with drug and alcohol use disorders and predicting their relapse through observation and assessment is a primary theme of this presentation. This presentation will also outline the current research and developments in understanding substance use disorders and their relapse. Various forms of evidence-based treatment will be described so that employer supports, professionals and the EAP has an opportunity to provide more effective assessment tools and referrals. Finally, preventing relapse will be recommended to attendees through the development of workplace supports for the recovering employee. Medical and psychosocial research has revolutionized our currently understanding of the disease of addiction. The goal of this presentation is to expose employer supports, professionals and the EAP to the biological and psychological underpinnings of the disease and what medical and psychosocial interventions are available to move substance use disorders to remission and prevent their relapse.

 

380. The Life, Art and Healing of Elizabeth Layton: A Creative Pathway to Integration 1909-1993 (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Ericha Scott, PhD, ATR-BC, REAT

Level of Instruction: All

Elizabeth Layton began drawing at age 68, while grieving the death of her alcoholic son. She had been in & out of psychiatric treatment (13 episodes of electroshock) for bipolar disorder with poor results. In addition, she was codependent with her alcoholic first husband & may have mishandled her psychotropic medications. After her son’s death, with her sister’s urging, she took a drawing class. She studied a blind contour drawing technique & unknowingly incorporated a form of Freud’s free association. By focusing on her sorrow and loss in her daily blind contour drawings, she cured her depression within six months. Her depression never returned and due to the tireless work of journalist Don Lambert, she exhibited her artwork at the Smithsonian and a multitude of galleries & museums. At the end of her life she was visited by artists from around the world.

Sober Living Workshop

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

381. The Benefits of Peer Support and Recovery Coaching (1.5 CEs/CMEs NAADAC Credit Only)
Ben Hinman
Trey Laird
Melissa Killeen, MSOD, MPhil
Nanette Zumwalt, ICADAC II-CS, ICCJP, CIP, CRS
Supported by: One Step, The Lighthouse Sober Living, Recovery 365, MK Recovery Coaching and Hired Power

Level of Instruction: All

Everyone is becoming a peer support specialist or recovery coach these days. Even Medicaid is starting to reimburse for peer support. But what exactly does a recovery coach do? How can you get trained or incorporate recovery coaching into your program? Is it effective?

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM Registration is Open in La Cita
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

400. Primary Mental Health Disorder Interventions and Transports with Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders and/or Eating Disorders (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Kristin Agar, MSW, LCSW, CIP, CAI
Meredith Sonetz, MA, LCPC, CADC
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Mental health interventions and transports are no different than any other intervention, right? Wrong! When preparing for and facilitating an intervention for someone with a mental health diagnosis, specific strategies and guidelines are necessary to ensure both safety and success. In this session we will discuss the necessity of clinical training and education when conducting these interventions, factors to be considered with different diagnoses, and management of potential decompensation during the intervention and transport. Intervention models, team size, and other critical factors will be presented along with case studies. The importance of engaging the family/friends support network will be addressed as well as the guidelines for transports to meet the safety and medical needs of those being transported to and from treatment. Safe travel can be extremely difficult with this population. Understanding that not all transports are treated equally is a key factor for a safe journey and smooth transition.

 

401. Accessing The Combined Knowledge In The Treatment Industry: How To Help Individuals, Families And Communities Access Resilience In The Worldwide Pandemic Of Mental Illness, Addiction, And Trauma To Improve Long-Term Outcomes (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Michael Harle, MHS
Jeffrey Skillen
Judith Landau, MD, DPM, LMFT, CFLE, CIP, CAI, CRS
Gale Saler, LCPC, CRC-MAC, CAI, CIP
Supported by: Guadenzia, Inc., SkillSet Enterprises, ARISE Network and Linking Human Systems & Newport Academy

Level of Instruction: All

There is a dramatic increase in risk-taking behavior precipitated by the wave of personal and societal violence, climate change, and social disconnection. Social and digital media replace personal connection, resulting in a lack of individual, family and community support. Increasing trauma, causes a parallel increase in post-traumatic stress, substance abuse, sexual risk-taking, and behavioral compulsions or process addictions along with an increase in other chronic and life-threatening physical and mental illnesses. Addressing this global pandemic requires historical context to evaluate opportunities for change and healing. This panel includes pioneers, leaders, researchers, and practitioners whose collective experience spans the past 50 years in the treatment industry movement. They will present, discuss and illustrate, through case studies and outcome research, the urgent need to revisit our therapeutic origins to reorient our approach towards collective resilience as a healing community. It is time to bridge our philosophical differences and combine our effective methodologies.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

450. Allies in the Battle: Strengthening Relationships Between Treatment Providers and the Medical Community (1.5 CEs/CMEs)
Michael Peterson, LCSW, ASAM
Supported by: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The recovery community and the medical community are both on the front lines of the epidemic of substance-use disorders. Treatment providers have frequent interaction with local emergency rooms and hospitals. Hospital patients become treatment center clients, and sometimes clients become patients again. Despite what should be a natural alliance between the two communities, misunderstandings persist. This session will explore treatment and recovery from the perspective of the medical community. Michael Peterson will lead a conversation to explore the following questions: What are emergency rooms and hospitals encountering in the epidemic in 2019? What does the medical community need from partners in the treatment community? How can treatment programs network with local hospitals? (Hint: You’re probably doing it wrong!) What is “Evidence-Based Medicine” and why does it matter? Please come participate in the conversation and learn ways to build this critical alliance.

 

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  • Wonderfully scientific, applicable and well-presented addiction conference. Will attend next year. Thank you!


  • ***** Five-star event


  • The C4 Recovery Staff is amazing -everyone works so hard to make sure it is a great experience for all attendees.


  • WSCAD 2016 was one of the best events I've ever attended. Looking forward to next year!


  • I look forward to this conference all year! It remains my very favorite! Thank you for making it a wonderful time of networking and education. It is now like a reunion for me.


  • This was a hot conference, and I don't mean the weather! (Palm Springs in June)


  • Top level instructors teaching "cutting edge" information at a beautiful and historic resort.


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  • I thought this was one of the best conferences that I have attended in the past few years. It was very well planned and the accommodations/venue was simply the best! Overall EXCELLENT experience!


  • This is my FAVORITE conference, awesome attendees, wonderful breakouts, great exposure for our program.


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